English Paper 3 Questions and Answers - Sukellemo Joint Mock Examinations July 2020

Share via Whatsapp

Instructions to candidates

  • Answer three questions only
  • Question one and two are compulsory.
  • In question 1, attempt only one essay.
  • Each of your essay should not exceed 450 words

FOR EXAMINER'S USE ONLY.

QUESTION  TOTAL MARKS  CANDIDATE'S SCORE 
1.Imaginative Composition 20  
2. The Compulsory Set Text 20  
3.The Optional Set Text 20  
TOTAL  60   


QUESTIONS

Imaginative composition   (20 marks)

  1. EITHER
    1. Write an interesting composition which ends with;
      ... Respect cannot be learned, purchased or acquired. It can only be earned.
      OR
    2. Write a composition on the importance of Huduma Number.
  2. Compulsory Text: Blossoms of the Savannah by Henry Ole Kulet. (20 marks)
    Not all aspects of culture are retrogressive. Using illustrations from the text Blossoms of the Savannah by Henry Ole Kulet, support this argument.
  3. Optional texts (20 marks)
    Answer any of the following three questions.
    1. A short story: The Memories We Lost and Other Short Stories
      Window Seat by Benjamin Branoff Closely drawing illustrations from Branoff Benjamin's story The Window Seat, support the observation that travelling by public means (vehicles) can be a nightmare to the passengers
    2. The Novel: The Pearl by John Steinbeck
      Using the novel The Pearl by John Steinbeck, write an essay to show the plight of the poor in the modern society.



MARKING SCHEME

Instructions to candidates 

  • Answer three questions only
  • Question one and two are compulsory.
  • Each of your essay should not exceed 450 words

Imaginative composition (20 marks)
1. a) Write an interesting composition which ends with; ... Respect cannot be learned, purchased or acquired. It can only be earned.

Paper 10171 is intended to test the candidate's ability to communicate in writing. Communication is established at different levels of intelligibility, correctness, accuracy, fluency, pleasantness and originality. Within the constraints set by each question, it is the linguistic competence shown by the candidate that should carry most of the marks. In a factual essay, attention must also be given to the format, tone and ability to follow instructions.

Examiners should not hesitate to use the full range of marks for each essay. In a two-essay paper, it is the final, total mark that counts. It is important to determine FIRST how each essay communicates and in which category A, B, C or Dit fits
DCLASS 01-05 The candidate does not communicate at all. or his/her language ability is so minimal that the examiner practically has to guess what the candidate wants to say. The candidate fails to fit English words he/she knows into meaningful sentences. The subject is glanced at or distorted. Practically no punctuation. All kinds of errors. "Broken English" is evident.
D-01-02 Chaotic. Little meaning whatsoever. Question paper or some words. From it simply copied
DO3 Flow of thought almost impossible to follow. The errors are continuous.
D+04-05 Although the English is often broken and the essay is full of errors of all types, we can at least guess what the candidate wants to say.
C CLASS The candidate communicates understandably but only more or less clearly He/she is not confident with his language. The subject is often undeveloped. There may be some digressions. Unnecessary repetitions are frequent. The arrangement is weak and the flow jerky. There is no economy of language. Mother tongue influence is felt.
C-06-07 The candidate obviously finds ir difficult to communicate his ideas. He/she is seriously hampered by his/her very limited knowledge of structure and vocabulary. This results in many gross errors of agreement, spelling, misuse of prepositions, tenses, verb agreement and sentence construction.
C08 The candidate communicates but not with consistent clarity. His/her linguistic abilities being very limited, he/she cannot avoid freguent errors in sentence structure. There is little variety or originality. Very bookish English. Links are weak, incorrect and repeated at times
C+09-10 The candidates communicates clearly but in a flat and uncertain manner. Simple concepts, Sentence forms are often strained there may be an overuse of clichés, unsuitable idioms. Proverbs are misquoted or misinterpreted. The flow is still jerky. There are some errors of agreement, spelling tenses, spelling.
B CLASS This class is characterized by greater fluency and ease of expression. The candidate demonstrates that he/she can use English as a normal way of expressing himself/herself. Sentences are varied and usually wall constructed. Some candidates become ambitious and even over-ambitious. There may be items of merit of the one word or one expression type. Many essays in this category may be just clean and unassuming but they still show that the candidate is at ease with the language.
B-11-12 The candidate communicates fairly and with some fluency. There may be little variety in sentence structure. Gross errors are still found occasionally.
B 13 The sentences are varied but rather simple. Straight forward. The candidate does not strain himself in an effort to impress. There is a fair range of vocabulary and idiom. Natural and effortless. Some items of merit. Economy of language.
B+14-15 The candidate communicates his ideas pleasantly and without strain. There are errors and slips. T'enses, spelling and punctuation are quite good. A number of items of merit of the "whole sentence" or the "whole expression" type.
A CLASS The candidate communicates not only fluently, but attractively with originality and efficiency. He/she has the ability to make us share his/her deep feelings, emotions, enthusiasms. He/she expresses himself /herself freely and without any visible constraint The script gives evidence of malu planning and often humour. Many items of merit which indicate that the candidate has complete command of the language. There is no strain, just pleasantness, clever arrangement, felicity of expression.
A-16-17 The candidate shows competence and fluency in using the language. He /she may lack imagination or originality which usually provides the "spark" in such essays. Vocabulary, idiom, sentence structure, links, variety are impressive. Gross errors are very rare.
A 18 Positive ability. A few errors that are felt to be slips. The story or arguments has a definite impact. No grammar problem. Variety of structures. A definite spark. Many margin ticks.
A+19-20 The candidate communicates not only information and meaning, but also and especially the candidate's whole self: his her feelings, tastes, points of view, youth, culture. This ability to communicate his/her deep self may express itself in many ways. wide range of effective vocabulary, original approach, vivid and

b) Write a composition on the importance of Huduma Number
Some points to consider

  • For easy access of government services
  • Consolidation of many personal numbers into one e.g, driving license, passport number, identification number, NHIF number and NSSF number.
  • Security reasons.
  • To differentiate Kenyans from nonKenyans.

2. Compulsory Text: Blossoms of the Savannah by Henry Ole Kulet. (20 marks)
Not all aspects of culture are retrogressive. Using illustrations from the text Blossoms of the Savannah by Henry Ole Kulet, support this argument.

Introduction (2 marks)
Traditions form part of the culture of a people and are handed down from one generation to the next. Positive aspects of culture in Nasila are important in holding people together. There are many aspects of Nasilian culture which are positive. (Any other valid introduction) Points of interpretation (12 marks)

  • The songs the young people and children sing during Ole Kaelo's homecoming ceremony attest to the rich Maa culture. The narrator says, "From the children's performance, it was evident that the cherished Nasilian traditional dance would stand the rest of time." (p.44). The writer says that the party was full of pomp and gaiety. This is brought out by jewelry won by the guests such as ivory, beads, coloured lesos, kangas and shukas (p.47), all attesting to the rich cultural heritage of the Maa.
  • Generosity as a virtue is seen in Simiren who invites all those present in the party to savor his brother's lavish hospitality (p. 46). Food and drinks are served in generous measures to all those present (p. 47). Ole Musanka, an elder who blesses Ole Kaelo's home, glorifies Maa's culture saying that it was the blood and marrow that gave sustenance to the body" (p.51). According to him, home is Maa, Nasila, family and children (p.52). His only problem is that he supports FGM, a cultural practice that does not assist women in any way.
  • Communal life of the Maa people is another part of the culture that should be retained. Resian and Taiyo go to stay at their uncle's place for some time, they witness some positive aspects of communal life and unity at their uncle's home. "Life and work in that home was communal. Although each mother had her own house and cooked her own food, all grown up daughters helped each one of them" (p. 148). There is well laid down chain of command with the first wife being the depury to their uncle. There are hardly any disagreements and virtues of selfilessness and sharing are emphasized (p.149).
  • Clanship is a great part of the Nasilian culture, When Ole Kaelo's daughters are assaulted by two men, the clanship way of life comes in handy. All Ilmolelian clansmen join him Ole Kaelo) in pursuing the men and meting punishment on them. He is not left alone to deal with the matter. During Ole Kaelo's homecoming ceremony, young men and women from the clan work together to make the day successful. Ole Kaelo is touched after discovering that brotherhood, honour and selflessness still existed in Nasila and this makes him swear that he would never abandon the culture of his people or live outside his clan (p.40).
  • Nasila culture clearly defined relationships. "The founder had intended that the culture would regulate the lives of the people...It charted out the way for everyone, from cradle to the grave. It defined relationships, it created laws that governed the ownership of property and settled disputes. It did not discriminate, it did not favour anyone over the other, it gave everyone a chance to live a full life; it protected everyone within its confines and provided cleansing procedures for those who defiled it. It was simply a cherished way of life for all the Maa people..." (p. 118).
  • Meting justice in Nasila was seen as a fair endevour. Mama Milanoi appreciates Nasila culture which spares her nephew from death. She "...began to see the wisdom of the Maa founder who ensured thar justice was always fempered with mercy" (p. 163). According to Nasila culture, if a man sought refuge between the legs of an old man, he was to be spared despite the crime committed (p.162). Anybody who violates cultural values of Nasila culture is faced with laid down punishment. Both Niara Muyo and Lante who had attempted to rape Resian and Taiyo are forced to pay fines to the girls and their father and somehow, justice is done. "The two boys had been fined no heifers each" and Ntara Muyo "... an extra heifer to cover the shame that he had occasioned by accosting his own sister" (p. 164). Mama Milanoi also reminisces the old aspect of her culture which gave room for mass action in case somebody misbehaved and went against the expected conduct. A case in point is where an old man got infatuated by a girl of fourteen years. When women realized it, they attacked the man, stripped him naked and beat him up to death. That served as a detractor to any other man who would harbor such intentions. She wonders where such good aspects of Nasila culture had gone for they would shield her daughter from being forced to marry an old man like Oloisudori (pp.115-117).
  • Girls are protected according to the Nasila culture. A girl was always protected from men with evil intentions. Girls were kept away from male visitors in their homes and there was hardly any interaction between fathers and daughters (p.175).
  • Maa cultre defined love. The rich Maa culture has different types of love. There is elangatare where boys did anything possible to win girls' admiration (p.124). The elangatare love included feats by boys such as killing lions and defending people and their cattle from their enemies. There is also patureishi type of love where a girl and a boy were allowed to have a love affair alongside the conventional love. Such boys were the darlings of the girls and a song of praise would be composed by the girlfriend in praise of the valorous deeds of her boyfriend (pp. 124-125). This relationship ended in marriage after a marriage ceremony. On the other hand, the patureishi did not end in marriage. It was meant to check the conduct and behavior of young people and keep them disciplined

Conclusion (2 marks)
Mua culture to a great extent has cords thar bind its memebers together. When abandoning archaic cultures, it should be noted that that not everything in a culture should be done away with (Any other valid conclusion)

3. Optional texts (20 marks)
Answer any of the following three questions.
a) A short story: The Memories We Lost and Other Short Stories Window Seat by Benjamin Branoff
Closely drawing illustrations from Branoff Benjamin's story The Window Seat, support the observation that travelling by public means (vehicles) can be a nightmare to the passengers

**INTRODUCTION* 

  • General
  • Contextualized
  • General/Contextualized.
  • Outline of points of interpretation.

*Points of interpretation 12marks*

  1. Unroadworthy vehicles like the one being used by the narrator pg 62 the minivan daladala he keeps hitting a rusty ceiling
  2. Pollution especially noise environment is polluted by shouting...endless barrage of dust that drifts through the window pg 63/65.
  3. There are pickpockets in vehicles masquerading as passengers, they take advantage of the crowded vehicles van i.e. the narrator finds himself a victim of kanga lady pg 66-67
  4. Roads are poorly maintained making journey painful ie condition of the road is made ridiculous by the black asphalt slick and old pin strip...pg 64
  5. Overloading is common. The minivan is full to capacity 25people instead of the right capacity of 10 people pg 63 vi) Indifference from police who pretend to be checking on the vehicles are very annoying as passengers witness them receiving bribes pg 63,66,68.
    mark: 3:3:3:3 mrks

*CONCLUSION*
Valid conclusion (2mrks) it can be :

  • Recap of the topic 
  • Opinion.
  • Summary of points of interpretation 2mrks

b) The Novel: The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Using the novel The Pearl by John Steinbeck, write an essay to show the plight of the poor in the modern society.

  1. No access to education. Because education is expensive, the poor only think of it when they have the money. Kino thinks of taking Coyotito to school when he gets the pearl of the world. Lack of education has continually made the poor ignorant and thus being easy targets for exploitation by the doctor, pearl buyers etc. The doctor tricks Kino into believing that the baby is very sick because his eyes are blue. Their ignorance also makes them believe that the doctor's tools are the best.
  2. The poor are exploited. The pearl fishers continue to suffer under the greedy hands of pearl buyers. Kino knows his pearl is worth 50,000pesos yet the pearl buyers devalue it to a mere 1500. They use all manner of tricks to make him feel that the pearl is a monstrosity. Even their own agents never come back to them when they entrust them with their pearls to be sold in the city. As a result, the people of La Paz have lived a poverty riddled life.
  3. They have bad living conditions. The brush houses are almost inhabitable; no floors, thatched etc. They are a far cry of decent homes in the town. As the parents sleep on mats on the floor, poor coyotito sleeps in a hanging box. No wonder the dirty environment attracts dangerous insects like scorpions, not to mention pigs and stray dogs.
  4. No access to medical care. Upon being stung by the deadly scorpion, the parents think of taking the baby to the doctor. They are however turned away because they do not have money. They therefore resort to herbs and poultices. Even the available medical care is poor and marred with lots of deaths as evidenced by the beggars who see many bodies go into the church.
  5. The poor have no security. Upon getting the pearl, kino is attacked on numerous occasions by people who want it. Their brush houses can't guarantee them security as compared to the stone houses of the rich in town. He fights back and kills one of the attackers. Unfortunately, his house is burnt and he has to seek refuge in his brother's house. His boat is also vandalized to stop him from running away. Even on his way to the capital, the trackers pursue him relentlessly though he manages to kill them.

Download English Paper 3 Questions and Answers - Sukellemo Joint Mock Examinations July 2020.


Tap Here to Download for 50/-




Why download?

  • ✔ To read offline at any time.
  • ✔ To Print at your convenience
  • ✔ Share Easily with Friends / Students


Join our whatsapp group for latest updates
.
Subscribe now

access all the content at an affordable rate
or
Buy any individual paper or notes as a pdf via MPESA
and get it sent to you via WhatsApp

 

What does our community say about us?

Join our community on:

  • easyelimu app
  • Telegram
  • facebook page
  • twitter page
  • Pinterest