Social Studies - Grade 7 Curriculum Designs

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MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM DESIGN
GRADE 7
SOCIAL STUDIES
KENYA INSTITUTE OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 2021

TIME ALLOCATION

No Subject Number of Lessons Per Week
(40 minutes per lesson)
1 English 5
2 Kiswahili/KSL 4
3 Mathematics 5
4 Integrated Science 4
5 Health Education 2
6 Pre-Technical and Pre-Career Education 5
7 Social Studies 3
8 Religious Education (CRE/IRE/HRE) 2
9 Business Studies 3
10 Agriculture 3
11 Life Skills Education 1
12 Physical Education and Sports 2
13 Optional Subject 3
14 Optional Subject 3
  Total 45

 

NATIONAL GOALS OF EDUCATION
Education in Kenya should:

  1.  Foster nationalism and patriotism and promote national unity. Kenya’s people belong to different communities, races and religions, but these differences need not divide them. They must be able to live and interact as Kenyans. It is a paramount duty of education to help young people acquire this sense of nationhood by removing conflicts and promoting positive attitudes of mutual respect which enable them to live together in harmony and foster patriotism in order to make a positive contribution to the life of the nation.
  2.  Promote the social, economic, technological and industrial needs for national development.
    Education should prepare the youth of the country to play an effective and productive role in the life of the nation.
    1.  Social Needs
      Education in Kenya must prepare children for changes in attitudes and relationships which are necessary for the smooth progress of a rapidly developing modern economy. There is bound to be a silent social revolution following in the wake of rapid modernization. Education should assist our youth to adapt to this change.
    2. Economic Needs
      Education in Kenya should produce citizens with the skills, knowledge, expertise and personal qualities that are required to support a growing economy. Kenya is building up a modern and independent economy which is in need of an adequate and relevant domestic workforce.
    3.  Technological and Industrial Needs
      Education in Kenya should provide learners with the necessary skills and attitudes for industrial development. Kenya recognizes the rapid industrial and technological changes taking place, especially in the developed world. We can only be part of this development if our education system is deliberately focused on the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will prepare our young people for these changing global trends.
  3. Promote individual development and self-fulfilment
    Education should provide opportunities for the fullest development of individual talents and personality. It should help children to develop their potential interests and abilities. A vital aspect of individual development is the building of character.
  4. Promote sound moral and religious values.
    Education should provide for the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes that will enhance the acquisition of sound moral values and help children to grow up into self-disciplined, self-reliant and integrated citizens.
  5.  Promote social equality and responsibility.
    Education should promote social equality and foster a sense of social responsibility within an education system which provides equal educational opportunities for all. It should give all children varied and challenging opportunities for collective activities and corporate social service irrespective of gender, ability or geographical environment.
  6. Promote respect for and development of Kenya’s rich and varied cultures.
    Education should instill in the youth of Kenya an understanding of past and present cultures and their valid place in contemporary society. Children should be able to blend the best of traditional values with the changing requirements that must follow rapid development in order to build a stable and modern society.
  7. Promote international consciousness and foster positive attitudes towards other nations.
    Kenya is part of the international community. It is part of the complicated and interdependent network of peoples and nations. Education should therefore lead the youth of the country to accept membership of this international community with all the obligations and responsibilities, rights and benefits that this membership entails.
  8. Promote positive attitudes towards good health and environmental protection.
    Education should inculcate in young people the value of good health in order for them to avoid indulging in activities that will lead to physical or mental ill health. It should foster positive attitudes towards environmental development and conservation. It should lead the youth of Kenya to appreciate the need for a healthy environment.

LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL
By the end of Middle School, the learner should be able to:

  1. Apply literacy, numeracy and logical thinking skills for appropriate self-expression.
  2. Communicate effectively, verbally and non-verbally, in diverse contexts.
  3. Demonstrate social skills, spiritual and moral values for peaceful co-existence.
  4. Explore, manipulate, manage and conserve the environment effectively for learning and sustainable development.
  5. Practice relevant hygiene, sanitation and nutrition skills to promote health.
  6. Demonstrate ethical behavior and exhibit good citizenship as a civic responsibility.
  7. Appreciate the country's rich and diverse cultural heritage for harmonious co-existence.
  8. Manage pertinent and contemporary issues in society effectively.
  9. Apply digital literacy skills for communication and learning.

ESSENCE STATEMENT

Social Studies is an integrated subject including aspects of History, Geography and Citizenship. It is the study of change and development in society over time. It enables the learner to understand and evaluate how past human action has an impact on the present and how it influences the future. It also involves the study of the natural and historic built environments. It examines both physical and human processes over space and time. It encourages civic responsibility and responsible leadership, including raising current social and environmental concerns. It prepares the learner for local, regional, national, regional and global responsibility. The subject aims at providing the learner with knowledge, skills, values and attitudes necessary for good character formation to enable him or her to live harmoniously in the family and society. The main theme of Social Studies is ‘Living Together ’Social Studies will enable the learner to be aware and be concerned about the welfare of others, protect the environment and be active at community, national, regional and global levels.

 

Social Studies highlights essential functions of education related to the formation of citizenship and promotion of social cohesion. It is a concern with the relevance of knowledge, skills and values for the participation of citizens in and their contribution to, dimensions of societal development, which are linked at local and global levels. It is directly related to the civic, social and political socialization function of education. The purpose of social studies is to enable the learner to make informed decisions for the public good as a citizen of a culturally diverse democratic society. It deals with people, interpersonal relationships, their culture and how they relate to natural and historic built environments. The environment contains resources that enable people to survive. As people live together, they establish systems of governance. Social Studies enables the learner to gain understanding of basic principles of national values, democracy, social, economic and political developments. Further, Social Studies facilitate the learners to gain a realization of their place, privileges, rights and responsibilities as citizens, at local, national, regional and global levels.

Social Studies is anchored on the tenets of the Constitution of Kenya, Kenya Vision 2030, the National Goals of Education and the Kenya Sessional Paper No. 8 of 2013 on national values and principles of governance It is also in line with Africa Agenda 2063 and the Strategic Objective 10, of the Continental Education Strategy for Africa 2016-2025 which envision “an integrated, prosperous and peaceful Africa. In addition, Social Studies addresses the 2017 AU Ministers of Education decision to integrate General History of Africa in School Curricula and aspirations of SDG 4: target 7 and Goal 16.

Theories of learning such as Jean Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, Lawrence Kohlberg theory of moral development, Dewey’s social constructivism and Vygotsky’s socio- cultural development theory have informed the development of this design. Social Studies will prepare the learners for the social sciences pathway in senior school.

SUBJECT GENERAL LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of Junior Secondary School, the learner should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of historical concepts, historical sources and evidence for development of identity and sense belonging
  2. Appreciate and be proud of the Kenyan cultural heritage and be willing to further develop, preserve and share it globally
  3. Contribute to construction and advancement of the social, economic and political development necessary for learning and living
  4. Develop and apply values and basic principles of democracy, governance, human rights and roles as a responsible citizen
  5. Cultivate respect and appreciation for diversity and differences that contribute to international understanding for mutual social responsibility
  6. Understand the value of environment , resources and their influence on human activities to use, manage and conserve for sustainable development
  7. Contribute to the management of contemporary and pertinent issues as informed, engaged, ethical and responsive citizen
  8. Develop and apply social research and digital literacy competencies to interpret phenomena for problem solving in society.

STRAND 1.0: SOCIAL STUDIES

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
1.0 Social Studies 1.1 Career and Entrepreneurial Opportunities in Social Studies
(3 Lessons)
By the end of the sub-strand, the
learner should be able to:
  1. analyze importance of social studies for personal development and service to humanity
  2. explore career opportunities related to social studies in Kenya and globally
  3. examine entrepreneurial opportunities for Social Studies in society
  4. apply appropriate strategies for addressing gender stereotypes associated with career choices and entrepreneurial opportunities in Social Studies
  5. recognize biological differences devoid of stereotypes in career choices and entrepreneurial opportunities in social studies) demonstrate respect for one’s gender identity in pursuit of Social Studies careers and entrepreneurial opportunities
  6. appreciate the role of social studies for promotion of social cohesion
Learner is guided to:
  • brainstorm on the importance of social studies for personal development service to humanity
  • use print or digital resources to explore careers in social studies in Kenya and globally
  • create a list of careers in history, geography and citizenship education from a list of university career options
  • Discuss suitable careers in social studies
  • Initiate and develop class rules that discourage gender stereotypes in career choices.
  • brainstorm on entrepreneurial opportunities for Social Studies in society
  • create a poster of all entrepreneurial opportunities for Social Studies in society and display it in school

 

  1. How do careers and entrepreneurial opportunities emanating from Social Studies serve self and humanity?
  2. How can we demonstrate respect for one’s gender identity in pursuit of career and entrepreneurial opportunities in Social Studies?
  3. . How can we address gender stereotypes associated with career choices and entrepreneurial opportunities in Social Studies?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Citizenship as learners initiate and develop class rules that discourage gender stereotypes in career choices.
  • Communication as learners brainstorm on the importance of social studies for personal development service to humanity
  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving as learners initiate and develop class and club rules that discourage gender stereotypes
  • Self-efficacy as learners discuss suitable careers and hold peer led symposia on careers in Social Studies
  • Learning to Learn as learners participate in talks by resource persons about prevention of gender stereotypes associated with careers, in mentorship and job shadowing sessions on Social Studies careers and sensitization sessions on career choices during career education weeks in schools.
Values:
  • Patriotism as learners initiate and develop class rules that discourage gender stereotypes in career choices.
  • Respect as learners demonstrate respect for one’s gender identity in daily interactions regardless of sociocultural perspectives
  • Peace as learners recognise biological differences devoid of stereotypes in career choices in social studies
  • Integrity as learners initiate and develop class and club rules that discourage gender stereotypes.
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Self-awareness as learners identify suitable careers in social studies
  • Gender awareness as learners address gender stereotypes associated with career choices in school and the community
  • Decision Making as learners explore careers and entrepreneurial opportunities related to Social Studies
  • Problem Solving as learners apply appropriate strategies for addressing gender stereotypes associated with career choices in school and the community.
Link to other subjects:
  • Computer Science as learners use digital resources to explore careers in Social Studies in Kenya and globall
  • Life Skill Education as learners identify possible careers that they may take in the social studies field and participate in mentorship and job shadowing sessions on Social Studies careers
  • Pre-Technical and Pre- Career Studies as learners use print or digital resources to explore careers in social studies in Kenya and globally
  • Computer Science as learners use digital resources to explore careers in Social Studies in Kenya and globally
  • Business Studies as learners brainstorm on entrepreneurial opportunities in Social Studies
  • Hindu Religious Education, Islamic Religious Education and Christian Religious Education as leaners promote human dignity and equality before God and value biological differences devoid of stereotypes
  • Kenyan Sign Language, Kiswahili and English as learners develop communication messages and create talking walls with slogans on gender equity and careers.
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to analyse
importance of
Social Studies for
personal
development and
service to
humanity
Correctly and
comprehensively
analyses importance of
Social Studies for
personal development
and service to humanity
Correctly
analyses
importance of
Social Studies for
personal
development and
service to
humanity
Partially analyses
importance of Social
Studies for personal
development and
service to humanity
With support correctly
partially analyses
importance of Social
Studies for personal
development and service
to humanity
Ability to explore
career
opportunities
related to Social
Studies in Kenya
and globally
Correctly and concisely
explores career
opportunities related to
Social Studies in Kenya
and globally
Correctly
explores career
opportunities
related to Social
Studies in Kenya
and globally
Partly explores some
of the career
opportunities related
to Social Studies in
Kenya and globally
With challenges correctly
explores some of the
career opportunities
related to Social Studies
in Kenya and globally
Ability to
examine
entrepreneurial
opportunities for
Social Studies in
society
Correctly and
elaborately examines
entrepreneurial
opportunities for Social
Studies in society
Correctly
examines
entrepreneurial
opportunities for
Social Studies in
society
Partly examines
some ofd the
entrepreneurial
opportunities for
Social Studies in
society
With assistance examines
entrepreneurial
opportunities for Social
Studies in society

STRAND 2.0: NATURAL AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENTS IN AFRICA

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
2.0 Natural and the Built Environments in Africa 2.1 Maps and Map Work
(5 Lessons)
By the end of the sub strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. describe the position, shape and size of Africa
  2. Identify the countries that make up the African continent
  3. use latitudes and longitudes to locate places and features on a map
  4. calculate the time of different places in the world using longitudes
  5. distinguish pictures, plans and maps as used in social studies
  6. examine the three types of maps used in social studies
  7. recognize the importance of maps in day to day lives 
Learner is guided to:
  • brainstorm in groups, the position, shape and size of Africa and share in class
  • brainstorm in groups the countries that make up Africa and display in class
  • draw an outline map of Africa and indicate the countries that make up Africa and display in class
  • use relevant print, media or digital devices to establish the position and location of places and features on a map
  • practice calculating time of different places using longitudes
  • using pictures, plans and maps differentiate the three as used in social studies.
  • research on the three types of maps used in Social Studies and make summary notes (Topographical maps, Sketch maps and Atlas Maps)
  • discuss in groups the uses of different types of maps and present in class
  1. How do we locate places and features on a map?
  2. How important are maps in our daily lives?
  3. How are latitudes and longitudes useful in day to day lives?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Citizenship as learners take pride and have a sense of belonging to Kenya as they describe the location and position of Kenya in Africa
  • Collaboration as learners practice in pairs calculating time of different places using longitudes
  • Digital Literacy as learner use digital devices to establish the position and location of places and features on a map
  • Critical thinking as learner use latitudes and longitudes to locate places and features on a map
  • Self-efficacy as learners draw an outline map of Africa and indicate the countries that make up Africa for display in class
Values:
  • Responsibility as learners research on the three types of maps used in Social Studies and make summary notes
  • Patriotism as learner draw an outline map of Africa and indicate the countries that make up Africa and display in class
  • Unity as they work in groups to brainstorm the position, shape and size of Africa and share the points in class
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Social cohesion as learners brainstorm in groups, the position, shape and size of Africa and share in class
  • Environmental Education as learners use latitudes and longitudes to locate the position of places and features on a map
  • Self-esteem as learners use longitudes correctly to calculate time of different places in the world.
Link to other subjects:
  • Computer Science as learners use relevant print, media or digital devices to practice calculating time of different places using longitude
  • Mathematics as learners use longitudes to calculate time of different places in the world
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners brainstorm in groups, the position, shape and size of Africa and share their ideas in class
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
1. Ability to describe the position, shape, and size of Africa Correctly and comprehensively describes the position, shape, and size of
Africa
Correctly describes the position,
shape, and size of Africa
Partially describes the position,
shape, and size of Africa
With assistance describes the position,
shape, and size of Africa
2. Ability to use latitudes and longitudes to locate places and features on a map Accurately and consistently uses latitudes and longitudes to locate places and features on
a map
Accurately uses latitudes and longitudes to locate places and features on a map Fairly uses latitudes and longitudes to locate some of the places and features on a map

With challenges accurately uses latitudes and longitudes to locate some of the
places and features on a
map

 

3. Ability to calculate time of different places in the World using
Longitudes
Accurately and explicitly calculates time of different places in the World using
Longitudes
Accurately  calculates time of different places in the World using
Longitudes
Partially calculates time of
some of the different
places in the World using Longitudes
With assistance accurately calculates time of
some of the different
places in the World using Longitudes
4. Ability to distinguish pictures, plans and maps as used in
Social Studies
Correctly and constantly distinguishes pictures, plans and maps as used
in Social Studies
Correctly distinguishes pictures, plans and maps as used in
Social Studies
Fairly distinguishes some of the pictures, plans and maps as used in Social
Studies
With challenges correctly distinguishes some of the pictures, plans and maps as used
in Social Studies
5. Ability to examine the three types of maps used in
Social Studies
Correctly and distinctively examines the three types of maps
used in Social Studies
Correctly  examines the three types of maps
used in Social Studies
Somewhat examines some of the the three types of maps used
in Social Studies
With support correctly examines some of the three types of maps used
in Social Studies

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
2.0 Natural and the Built Environments in Africa

2.2 The
Earth and the Solar system

(5 Lessons)

By the end of the sub strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. describe the origin, size, shape and position of the earth in the solar system
  2. examine the effects of rotation and revolution of the earth on human activities
  3. illustrate the internal structure of the earth in the solar system
  4. appreciate the effects of rotation and revolution of the earth on human activities
 Learner is guided to:
  • share stories on the origin of the earth from their communities
  • use relevant print or digital resources to find out about the theories explaining the origin of the earth (the passing star theory and the Nebula theory)
  • use print or media resources to brainstorm in groups size, shape and position of the earth in the solar system
  • do library research on effects of rotation and revolution of the earth on human activities
  • draw the solar system and indicate the position of the earth as the home of humankind
  • model the solar system and show the position of the earth and display in class
  • draw the internal structure of the earth and display in class( core, mantle and crust).
  1. How did
    the earth come into being?
  2. Why is it important to understand the solar system?
  3. How does the rotation and revolution of the earth influence day to day life?

 

Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Learning to learn as learners do library research on the position of the earth in the solar system and write short notes
  • Self-efficacy as learner model the solar system and show the position of the earth and display in class
  • Citizenship as learner draw the solar system and indicate the position of the earth as the home of humankind
  • Creativity and Imagination as learner model the internal structure of the earth, display in class, do gallery walk to peer assess the models
Values:
  • Respect as learner share stories on the origin of the earth
  • Patriotism as learner draw the solar system and indicate the position of the earth as the home of human kind
  • Unity as learner brainstorm in groups on the origin, size, shape of the earth and share the findings in class  
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Environmental Education as learner examine the effects of rotation and revolution of the earth on human activities
  • Social cohesion as learner share stories on the origin of the earth from their communities and brainstorm in groups on the origin, size, shape of the earth and share in class
Link to other subjects:
  • Integrated Science as learner explain the origin, size, shape and position of the earth in the solar system
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learner do library research on the position of the earth in the solar system and write short notes
  • Computer Science as learner use relevant print or digital resources to find out about the theories explaining the origin of the earth (the passing star theory and the Nebula theory)
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to describe the origin, size, shape and position of the earth in the solar system Accurately and exhaustively describes the origin, size, shape and position of the earth in the solar
system
Accurately  describes the origin, size, shape and position of the earth in the solar
system
Partially describes the origin, size, shape and position of the earth in the solar system With support accurately describes the origin, size, shape and position of the earth in the
solar system
Ability to examine the effects of rotation and revolution of the earth on human activities Correctly and comprehensively examines the effects of rotation and revolution of the earth on human activities Correctly  examines the effects of rotation and revolution of the earth on human activities Partly examines the effects of rotation and revolution of the earth on human activities Partly examines the effects of rotation and revolution of the earth on human activities
Ability to illustrate the internal structure of the earth in the solar system Correctly and creatively illustrates the internal structure of the earth in the solar system Correctly  illustrates the internal structure of the earth in the solar system Fairly illustrates the internal structure of the earth in the solar system With challenges correctly illustrates some aspects of the internal structure of
the earth in the solar system

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
2.0 Natural and the Built Environments In Africa 2.3.
Weather
(5 Lessons)
By the end of the sub strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. describe the elements of weather in the environment
  2. analyze and interpret data on weather conditions in the environment
  3. explain the factors considered when siting a weather station
  4. construct selected instruments for measuring elements of weather
  5. examine the significance of weather to human environment
  6. respond appropriately to different weather conditions in the environment.

Learner is guided to:

  • use relevant print or digital resources to describe the elements of weather in the environment
  • use appropriate print, media or digital resources to analyze and interpret data on weather conditions in the environment
  • in groups, record and calculate weather conditions in the local environment (temperature, rainfall)
  • demonstrate how to site a weather station in the school compound
  • in groups use locally available materials to construct selected instruments for measuring elements of weather (a rain gauge/ wind vane/windsock) and peer
    assess
  • in groups brainstorm on significance of weather to human environment and how to appropriately change to varied weather
    conditions
  1. Why are
    elements of weather in the environment important?
  2. How do we use data on whether to make informed decisions?
  3. How can we predict change in weather conditions?

 

Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Communication as learners describe the elements of weather, compose and sing songs or recite poems on the significance of weather to the human environment
  • Self-efficacy as learners accurately measure, calculate , analyze and present weather data
  • Learning to learn as learners work in pairs and or in groups to measure, record, analyze and interpret weather data
  • Digital literacy as learners use appropriate digital resources to describe elements of weather, analyze and interpret data on weather conditions 
Values:
  • Responsibility as learners carefully handle instruments for measuring weather elements, analyze and interpret weather data using digital resources
  • Respect and love for one another as learners measure the weather elements, consider each others’ views; construct instruments for measuring elements of weather and compose and sing songs or recite poems on the significance of weather to human activities
    
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Safety and security as learners acquire knowledge on weather elements and respond appropriately to different weather conditions and as they construct the weather instrument in the environment
  • Decision making as learners make informed decisions based on the analysis and interpretation of weather data  
Link to other subjects:
  • English ,Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners describe the elements of weather, recite poems, compose and sing songs on the significance of weather to human environment
  • Mathematics as learners work in pairs to record and calculate weather data and use appropriate digital devices to analyze and interpret data on weather conditions
  • Computer Science as learners use relevant digital resources to describe the elements of weather in the environment and when using appropriate digital devices to analyse and interpret data on weather conditions
  • Visual Arts as they construct instruments for measuring elements of weather (rain gauge, wind vaneorwindsock)
  • Performing Arts as learners compose and sing songs or recite poems on the significance of weather to human environment
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to describe the elements of weather in the
environment
Correctly and systematically describes the elements of weather in the environment Correctly  describes the elements of weather in the environment Partially describes some of the elements of weather in the environment With support describes some of the elements of weather in the environment
Ability to analyze and interpret data on weather conditions Accurately and exceptionally analyses and interprets data on weather conditions Accurately  analyses and interprets data on weather conditions Partially analyses and interprets data on weather conditions With assistance analyses and interprets data on weather conditions
Ability to explain the factors considered in siting a weather
station
Correctly and exhaustively explains the factors considered in siting a weather station Correctly  explains the factors considered in siting a weather station Moderately explains the factors considered in siting a weather station With support explains some of the factors considered in siting a weather station
Ability to construct selected instruments for measuring elements of weather (rain gaugeorwind
vane) 
Creatively and artistically construct selected instruments for measuring elements of weather (rain gauge or wind
vane) 
Accurately construct a  selected instruments for measuring elements of weather(rain gauge or wind vane) Partially constructs some of the selected instruments for measuring elements of weather (rain gauge or wind vane)  With assistance constructs some of the selected instruments for measuring elements of weather(rain gauge or wind vane)
Ability to examine the significance of weather to human environment Correctly and logically examines the significance of weather to human environment Correctly examines the significance of weather to human environment Partially examines the significance of weather to human environment With assistance examines the significance of weather to human environment

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
2.0 Natural and Built Environment Africa 2.3 Historical Information

(4 Lessons)
By the end of the sub strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. identify various sources of historical information in the society
  2. distinguish between primary and secondary sources of historical information
  3. explore how various sources of historical information have been preserved over the years.
  4. assess the significance of various sources of historical information in providing evidence of past human accounts.
  5. recognize sources of historical information in understanding past human accounts.
  6. acknowledge the use of various sources of historical information in the study of the past.
Learner is guided to:
  • use appropriate print , media or digital resources to find out sources of historical information in the society and share in class
  • Design posters on primary and secondary sources of historical information in the society and display in class.
  • Discuss ways of preserving sources of historical information
  • Debate on the significance of various sources of historical information in providing evidence of past human accounts.
  1. How do people write their history?
  2. How does the past shape the present and future?
  3. How are primary and secondary sources of historical information acquired?
  4. How significant are sources of historical information in understanding past human accounts?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Communication and Collaboration as learners express themselves with clarity as they debate on the significance of historical information
  • Digital Literacy as learners find out the sources of historical information using appropriate media
  • Learning to learn as learners debate on the significance of sources of historical information
  • Citizenship as they learn about sources of historical information and explore how the historical sources of information have been preserved
Values:
  • Patriotism as learners explore how the sources of historical information have been preserved.
  • Unity as learners work together designing posters on sources of primary and secondary sources of historical information and display them in class
  • Responsibility as learners correctly use appropriate print , media or digital resources to find out sources of historical information and share the same in class
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Self-esteem as learners debate on the significance sources of historical information to the society
  • Creative thinking as learners skillfully create posters on the sources of historical information and display them conveniently in class
  • Social cohesion as learners debate as a class on the significance of historical sources of information in the society
Link to other subjects:
  • English /Kiswahili / Kenyan Sign Language as learners discuss, in small groups, sources of historical information in the society and debate on the significance of historical sources of information in the society
  • Visual Arts as learners design posters on sources of primary and secondary sources of historical information in the society
  • Computer Science as learners use appropriate media/digital resources to find out sources of historical information in the society and share in class
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to identify sources of historical information in the society Accurately and exhaustively identifies sources of historical information in the society Accurately identifies sources of historical information in the society Moderately identifies some of the sources of historical information in the society With support identifies some of the sources of historical information in the society
Ability to distinguish between the primary and secondary sources of historical
information in the society
Correctly and distinctly distinguishes between the primary and secondary sources of historical information in the society Correctly  distinguishes between the primary and secondary sources of historical information in the society Somewhat distinguishes between the primary and secondary sources of historical information in the society Has challenges distinguishing between the primary and secondary sources of historical information in the society
Ability to explore how sources of historical information have
been preserved in the society
Correctly and comprehensively explores how the sources of historical information
have been preserved in the society
Correctly  explores how the sources of historical information
have been preserved in the society
To some extent explores the sources of historical information have
been preserved in the society
With assistance explores how some of the sources of historical information
have been preserved in the society
Ability to assess the
significance sources of historical information in providing evidence of past human
accounts. 
Correctly and
comprehensively assesses the significance of sources of historical information in providing evidence of past human
accounts. 
Correctly  assesses the significance of historical information in providing evidence of past human
accounts.
Partly assesses the
significance of sources of historical information in providing evidence of past human
accounts.
With assistance
assesses the significance of sources  of historical information in providing evidence of
past human accounts.

STRAND 3.0: PEOPLE AND POPULATION

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
3.0 People and
Population

3.1 Human Origin

(4 Lessons)

By the end of the sub strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. explore the traditional stories of human origin from the selected African communities
  2. explain the religious stories about the origin of humankind
  3. examine factors proving that Africa is the cradle of humankind
  4. record traditional stories about the origin of humankind in society
  5. appreciate the various stories of human origin for self-identity
Learner is guided to:
  • engage a resource person to discuss the traditional and religious stories on human origin
  • in groups, learners compare the different stories on human origin
  • Write a collaborative essay on traditional and religious stories of human origin
  • use relevant print and electronic media resources to explain why Africa is the cradle of humankind
  • brainstorm on factors proving that Africa is the cradle of humankind
  • Discuss ways of recording traditional stories about the origin of humankind in society
  • Develop communication messages on Africa as the cradle of humankind
  1. Where did we come from?
  2. Why is Africa the cradle of Humankind?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Communication and Collaboration as learners work together in groups to compare different stories on human origin.
  • Creativity and Imagination as learners engage with a resource person to discuss the traditional and religious stories on human origin
  • Digital Literacy as learners use print and electronic media resources to search for information on human origin
  • Citizenship as learners identify with the information on traditional myths in the community on human origin
Values:
  • Responsibility as learners work in groups to compare different stories on human origin
  • Patriotism as learners share stories about human origin in the community.
  • Unity as learners work in groups to compare the different stories on Human Origin
  • Respect as learners engage a resource person to discuss the traditional and religious stories on human origin
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Self-esteem as learners create learners work in groups to compare different stories on human origin
  • Social Cohesion as learners use relevant print and electronic media resources to explain why Africa is the cradle land of humankind
Link to other subjects:
  • English, Kiswahili, Kenyan Sign Language and Indigenous languages as learners converse and document facts emerging from the discussions
  • Computer Science as learners use digital devices to search for information about human origin
  • IRE, HRE and CRE as learners engage a resource person to discuss the traditional and religious stories on human origin
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to explore
the traditional
stories of human
origin from the
selected African
communities
Correctly and
elaborately explores
traditional stories of
human origin from the
selected African
communities
Correctly explores
traditional stories of
human origin from
the selected African
communities
Minimally explores the
traditional stories of human
origin from the selected
African communities
With support
explores some of
the traditional
stories of human
origin from the
selected African
communities
Ability to explain
the religious
stories about origin
of humankind
Accurately and
elaborately explains
the religious stories of
the origin of
humankind
Accurately explains
the religious stories
of the origin of
humankind
Moderately explains the
religious stories about origin
of humankind
With assistance
explains the
religious stories of
the origin of
humankind
Ability to examine
factors proving
that Africa is the
cradle of
humankind
Accurately and
exhaustively examines
factors proving that
Africa is the cradle of
humankind
Accurately
examines factors
proving that Africa
is the cradle of
humankind
Partially examines the
factors proving that Africa is
the cradle of humankind
With support
examines some of
the factors proving
that Africa is the
cradle of humankind

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
3.0 People and Population 3.2 Early
Civilization

(4 lessons)
By the end of the sub- strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. define the term kingdom as used in history
  2. explore factors that led to growth of the selected ancient Kingdoms in Africa
  3. locate the selected ancient kingdoms on a map of Africa.
  4. assess the contributions of early African civilization to the modern world
  5. appreciate the contribution of early civilization to the development of modern world.
 Learners are guided to;
  • brainstorm factors which led to growth of ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and Kingdom of Kongo
  • use appropriate print or digital resources to locate ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kingdom of Kongo on a map of Africa
  • discuss in groups the contributions of early African civilization to the modern world
  • view an audio-visual documentary on the contribution of early African civilization to the modern world.
  1. Why is it important to study early African civilization today?
  2. How has early African civilization contributed to the development of modern world?

 

Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Communication as learners brainstorm factors which led to growth of Ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and Kingdom of Kongo.
  • Citizenship as learners use appropriate print or digital resources to locate ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kingdom of Kongo on a map of Africa and discuss in groups the contributions of early African civilization to the modern world
  • Digital Literacy as learner use appropriate print or digital devices to locate ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kingdom of Kongo on a map of Africa and view an audio-visual documentary on the contribution of early African civilization to the modern world
  • Learning to Learn as learners discuss in groups the contributions of early African civilization to the modern world
Values:
  • Responsibility as learners use appropriate print or digital resources to download map of Africa showing location Ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and Kingdom of Kongo
  • Respect as learners brainstorm factors which led to growth of Ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and Kingdom of Kongo.
  • Unity as learners discuss in groups the contribution of early African civilization to the modern world
  • Peace as learners work in groups to accomplish various tasks
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Self-esteem as learner brainstorm factors which led to growth of Ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and Kingdom of Kongo
  • Social cohesion as learner view in class an audio-visual documentary on contribution of early African civilization to modern world
  • Good Governance as learners explain factors which led to to growth of Ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and Kingdom of Kongo
Link to other subjects:
  • Computer Science as learner use digital devices to download map of Africa showing location Ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and Kingdom of Kongo.
  • Kenyan Sign Language, English and Kiswahili as learners brainstorm on factors which led to growth of Ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and Kingdom of Kongo
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to explore factors that led to growth of ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kongo Kingdom. Correctly and comprehensively explores factors that led to growth of ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kongo Kingdom. Correctly explores factors that led to growth of ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kongo Kingdom. Correctly explores some of the factors that led to growth of ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kongo Kingdom. With assistance explores some of the factors that led to growth of ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the
Kongo Kingdom.
Ability to locate ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kongo Kingdom on a map
of Africa.
Accurately and creatively locates ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kongo Kingdom on a map of Africa. Accurately locates ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kongo Kingdom on a map of Africa. Partially locates ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kongo Kingdom on a map of Africa. Has difficulties locating ancient Egypt, Great Zimbabwe and the Kongo Kingdom on a map of Africa.
Ability to assess the contributions of early African civilization to the
modern world.
Correctly and explicitly assesses the contributions of early African civilization to
the modern world.
Correctly assesses the contributions of early African civilization to
the modern world.
Correctly assesses some of the contributions of early African civilization to
the modern world.
With support assesses some of the contributions of early African civilization to
the modern world.

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
3.0 People and Population

3.3 Social Organization of selected African Communities up to 1900

(4 Lessons)

By the end of the sub- strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. locate on a map of Africa the areas settled by the selected African communities
  2. describe the social organization of selected African communities up to 1900
  3. compare the social organization of the selected African communities up to 1900
  4. Value the Kenyan and African rich cultural diversity among communities
  5. desire to appreciate and promote positive interactions among various communities.
Learners are guided to:
  • draw a map of Africa and indicate the areas settled by the selected African communities
    ( The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante )
  • use print or digital devices to research on social organization of selected African communities up to 1900 (The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante)
  • brainstorm in groups on the aspects of social organization of the selected African communities
  • debate on the differences and similarities in social organization of the selected African communities up to 1900
  1. How were African communities organized socially up to 1900?
  2. How can we promote positive interactions among communities?
  3. Why is the population of the Ogiek, Zulu and Asante declining?
  4. What can we do to empower the marginalized communities in society?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Communication and Collaboration as learners brainstorm the aspects of social organization of the selected African communities up to 1900.
  • Learning to learn as learners research on social organization of selected African communities up to 1900
  • Digital literacy as learners use digital devices to research on social organization of selected African communities up to 1900
Values:
  • Respect as learners recognize each other’s contribution as debate on the differences and similarities in social organization of the selected African communities up to 1900
  • Peace as learners brainstorm in groups on the aspects of social organization of the selected African communities
  • Responsibility as learners research on social organization of selected African communities up to 1900 (The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante)
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Social cohesion as learners draw a map of Africa and indicate the areas settled by the selected African communities
  • ( The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante ) and debate on the differences and similarity in social organization of the selected African communities up to 1900
  • Self-esteem as learners draw a map of Africa and indicate the areas settled by the selected African communities ( The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante )
Link to other subjects:
  • English, Kiswahili, Kenyan Sign Language and Indigenous languages as learners brainstorm various aspects of social organization of African communities up to 1900.
  • Computer Science as learners use digital devices to search for information on social organization of selected communities.
  • Visual Arts as learners draw a map of Africa and indicate the areas settled by the selected African communities ( The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante )
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to define kingdom Correctly and elaborately defines
kingdom
Correctly defines
kingdom
 Fairly defines
kingdom
With assistance defines
kingdom
Ability to locate on
a map of Africa the
areas settled by the
selected African
communities
Correctly and
consistently locates on
a map of Africa the
areas settled by the
selected African
communities
Correctly locates on
a map of Africa the
areas settled by the
selected African
communities
To some extent locates on
a map of Africa the
areas settled by the
selected African
communities
With support locates on
a map of Africa the
areas settled by the
selected African
communities
Ability to describe
the social
organization of
selected African
communities up to
1900
Accurately and
exhaustively describes
the social organization
of selected African
communities up to
1900
Accurately describes
the social organization
of selected African
communities up to
1900
Somewhat describes
the social organization
of selected African
communities up to
1900
With challenges describes
the social organization
of selected African
communities up to
1900
Ability to compare
the social
organization of the
selected African
communities up to
1900
Correctly and
elaborately compares
the social organization
of selected African
communities up to
1900
Correctly compares
the social organization
of selected African
communities up to
1900
Partially compares
the social organization
of selected African
communities up to
1900
With challenges compares
the social organization
of selected African
communities up to
1900

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
3.0 People and Population

3.4 Human Diversity and inclusion

(4 lessons)

By the end of the sub-strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. identify personality attributes which make individuals different from others
  2. categorize desirable and undesirable personality attributes in a multi- cultural society
  3. investigate different components of human identity in a multicultural society
  4. apply inclusion in day to day interactions
  5. show respect to others to promote social cohesion
  6. appreciate individual differences for social cohesion
Learner is guided to:
  • role play in class the unique personality attributes to enhance self-awareness
  • research using appropriate print, library resources or digital devices on desirable and undesirable personality attributes in a multi-cultural society
  • find out from community members, library resources print or other relevant sources different components of human identity in a multicultural society and share in class
  • debate on ways of applying inclusion in day to day interactions
  • compose and recite poems which propagate respect and appreciation of diversity to promote social cohesion.
  1. How is human identity useful in society
  2. How do varied personalities shape society?
  3. Why is respect and appreciation of diversity crucial for social cohesion?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Self-efficacy as learners research on desirable and undesirable personality attributes and present in class
  • Communication and Collaboration as learners brainstorm personality attributes which make individuals different from others.
  • Digital literacy as learners use digital devices to research on desirable and undesirable personality attributes in a multicultural society
  • Learning to learn as learners find out from find out from community members, library resources print or other relevant sources different components of human identity and share the information in class.   
Values:
  • Respect as learners listen to each other as they brainstorm personality attributes which make individuals different from others
  • Unity as the learners role play in class the unique personality attributes to enhance self-awareness 
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Self-esteem as learners compose and recite poems which propagate culture of respect among students and present in assembly once a term.
  • Self-awareness as learners role play in class the unique personality attributes to enhance self-awareness
  • Decision Making as learners categorize personality attributes into desirable and undesirable
  • Social Cohesion as learners role play in class the unique personality attributes to enhance self-awareness    
Link to other subjects:
  • Life Skills Education as learners brainstorm and categorize personality attributes into desirable and undesirable
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners brainstorm on personal attributes which make them different from others
  • Computer Science as learners use digital devices to research on desirable and undesirable personality attributes.
  • Performing Arts as learners recite poems which propagate respect and appreciation of diversity
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to identify personality attributes which make individuals different from others in school Accurately and comprehensively identifies personality attributes which make individuals different from others in school Accurately identifies personality attributes which make individuals different from others in school Somewhat identifies some of the personality attributes which make individuals different from others in school With assistance identifies some of the personality attributes which make individuals different from others in school
Ability to categorize desirable and undesirable personality attributes in a multi- cultural society Correctly and elaborately categorizes desirable and undesirable personality attributes in a multi- cultural society Correctly  categorizes desirable and undesirable personality attributes in a multi- cultural society Partially categorizes desirable and undesirable personality attributes in a multi- cultural society With challenges categorizes desirable and undesirable personality attributes in a multi- cultural society
Ability to investigate different components of human identity in a multi-cultural society Correctly and exhaustively investigates different components of human identity in a multi-cultural society Correctly  investigates different components of human identity in a multi-cultural society Fairly investigates different components of human identity in a multi-cultural society With support investigates some of the different components of human identity in a multi- cultural society

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
3. 0 People and Population 3.5 Peace and
Conflict Resolution

(4 lessons)
By the end of the sub strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. examine peace and conflict for personal wellbeing
  2. assess the contribution of personal peace to responsible citizenship
  3. discuss personal characteristics that express a state of peace for mutual social wellbeing
  4. investigate various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace for harmonious living
  5. promote peace at personal level for harmonious living
  6. recognize the significance of enhancing peace at the individual level
Learner is guided to:
  • find out the vernacular names for peace in their communities and share the information in class
  • compose and recite peace poems
  • brainstorm, in groups, personal characteristics that express a state of peace
  • brainstorm in groups various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace and the contribution of personal peace to responsible citizenship
  • write down what they plan to do in order to improve inner peace and relations with their family, school or community
  1. How can we promote peace at a personal level for mutual social wellbeing?
  2. How does personal peace contribute to responsible citizenship?
  3. How can we promote inner peace for harmonious living?

 

Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Citizenship as learners brainstorm in groups various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace and the contribution of personal peace to responsible citizenship
  • Self-efficacy as learners discuss personal characteristics that express a state of peace
  • Creativity and Imagination as learners brainstorm, in groups, personal characteristics that express a state of peace
  • Communication as learners brainstorm various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace and the contribution of personal peace to citizenship
  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving as learners write down what they plan to do in order to improve inner peace and relations with their family, school or community
Values:
  • Peace as learners apply various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace and make the community better through their skills, strengths and ideas.
  • Respect as learners learners discuss personal characteristics that express a state of peace
  • Unity as learners brainstorm in groups various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace and the contribution of personal peace to responsible citizenship
  • Responsibility as learners find out the vernacular names for peace in their communities and share the information in class and write down what they plan to do in order to improve inner peace and relations with their family, school or community Unity as learners brainstorm various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace and the contribution of personal peace to citizenship
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Self –awareness as learners find out the vernacular names for peace in their communities , share the information in class and discuss personal characteristics that express a state of peace
  • Social Cohesion as learners write down what they plan to do in order to improve inner peace and relations with their family, school or community and apply various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace
  • Conflict Resolution as learners write down what they plan to do to improve inner peace and relationships with their family, school or community. 
Link to other subjects:
  • Indigenous Languages as learners identify the vernacular names for peace in their communities and share the information in class
  • Life Skills Education as learners discuss personal characteristics that express a state of peace and explore various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace and the contribution of personal peace to citizenship
  • Performing Arts as learners compose and recite peace poems
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to examine peace and conflict for personal well wellbeing Correctly and precisely examines peace and conflict for personal well
wellbeing
Correctly examines peace and conflict for personal well
wellbeing
Partially examines peace and conflict for personal well
wellbeing
With assistance examines peace and conflict for personal well
wellbeing
Ability to assess the contribution of personal peace to responsible citizenship. Correctly and analytically assesses the contribution of personal peace to
responsible citizenship.
Correctly  assesses the contribution of personal peace to
responsible citizenship.
Partially assesses the contribution of personal peace to
responsible citizenship.
With difficulties assesses the contribution of personal peace to
responsible citizenship.
Ability to discuss personal characteristics that express a state of peace for mutual social wellbeing Correctly and elaborately discusses personal characteristics that express a state of peace for mutual
social wellbeing 
Correctly  discusses personal characteristics that express a state of peace for mutual social wellbeing Fairly discusses some personal characteristics that express a state of peace for mutual social wellbeing  With support discusses some personal characteristics that express a state of peace for mutual
social wellbeing
Ability to investigate various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace for harmonious living Correctly and exhaustively investigates various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace for harmonious
living
Correctly investigates various approaches that can promote one’s inner peace for harmonious living To some extent investigates some of the approaches that can promote one’s inner peace for harmonious living With assistance investigates some of the approaches that can promote one’s inner peace for harmonious living

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
3.0 People and Population 3.6 Slavery and Servitude


( 3 lessons)
By the end of the sub-strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. identify the various forms of slavery and servitude in traditional African society
  2. discuss the factors that led to development of the Indian Ocean slave trade
  3. describe the organization of Indian Ocean slave trade in 15th Century
  4. outline the various social injustices committed on the Africans during Indian Ocean slave trade in 15th Century slave trade
  5. Illustrate the geographical extent of the regions covered by Indian Ocean slave trade in Africa
  6. desire to promote human dignity for a just and peaceful world
  • Learner is guided to:
    Brainstorm in groups on:
    • meaning of slavery and servitude
    • various forms of slavery and servitude in traditional African society
  • Use print or view a video clip to identify factors which led to development of Indian Ocean slave trade.
  • Use print or digital resources to research on the organization of Indian Ocean slave trade.
  • Debate on various social injustices committed on the
    Africans during Indian Ocean slave trade in 15th Century
  • Use appropriate print or digital resources to locate the geographical extent of the regions covered by Indian Ocean slave trade in Africa
  1. Why has slavery and servitude been existing for thousands of years?
  2. How did slave trade limit development in in Eastern Africa?
  3. How does slavery and servitude undermine human rights?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Communication as learners Brainstorm in groups on meaning of slavery and servitude and various forms of slavery and servitude in traditional African society
  • Digital literacy as learners use digital devices to draw and locate areas slaves were taken to during Indian Ocean slave trade.
Values:
  • Unity as learners work groups tom brainstorm on various forms of slavery and servitude in traditional African society
  • Respect as learners debate in class on various social injustices committed on the Africans during Indian Ocean slave trade in 15th Century
  • Responsibility as learners use print or digital resources to locate the geographical extent of the regions covered by Indian Ocean slave trade in Africa
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Social cohesion as learners debate on the various social injustices committed on the Africans during Indian Ocean slave trade in 15th Century slave trade
  • Human Rights as learners Identify the various forms of slavery and servitude in traditional African society and locate areas where slaves were taken during Indian Ocean slave trade
  • Effective Communication as learners debate various social injustices committed on the Africans during Indian Ocean slave trade in 15th Century slave trade
Link to other subjects:
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners brainstorm forms of slavery and servitude
  • Computer Science as learners use digital devices to research on the organization of Indian Ocean slave trade.
  • Visual Arts as learners use digital devices to draw and locate areas where slaves were taken during Indian ocean slave trade
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to identify various forms of slavery and servitude in traditional African society   Correctly and comprehensively identifies various forms of slavery and servitude in traditional
African society 
Correctly identifies various forms of slavery and servitude in traditional
African society 
Correctly identifies some of the various forms of slavery and servitude in traditional African
society  
 With assistance identifies some of the various forms of slavery and servitude in traditional African
society 
Ability to discuss factors which led to development of Indian Ocean slave trade in Eastern Africa   Correctly and exhaustively discusses factors, which led to development of Indian Ocean slave trade in Eastern Africa   Correctly discusses factors, which led to development of Indian Ocean slave trade in Eastern Africa    Moderately discusses factors, which led to development of Indian Ocean slave trade in Eastern Africa   Has challenges discussing factors, which led to development of Indian Ocean slave trade in Eastern Africa 
Ability to describe the organization of Indian Ocean slave trade in Eastern Africa. Correctly and comprehensively describes the organization of Indian Ocean slave trade in
Eastern Africa.
Correctly describes the organization of Indian Ocean slave trade in
Eastern Africa.
Somewhat describes the organization of Indian Ocean slave trade in
Eastern Africa.
With support describes the organization of Indian Ocean slave trade in
Eastern Africa.
Ability to outline the various social injustices committed on the Africans during Indian Ocean slave trade Correctly and elaborately outlines the various social injustices committed on the Africans during Indian Ocean slave trade Correctly outlines the various social injustices committed on the Africans during Indian Ocean slave trade Partially outlines some social injustices committed on the Africans during Indian Ocean slave trade With assistance outlines some social injustices committed on the Africans during Indian Ocean slave trade
Ability to illustrate the geographical extent of the regions covered by Indian Ocean slave trade in Africa Correctly and concisely illustrates the geographical extent of the regions covered by Indian
Ocean slave trade in Africa
Correctly  illustrates the geographical extent of the regions covered by Indian
Ocean slave trade in Africa
Fairly illustrates the
geographical extent of the regions covered by Indian Ocean slave trade in
Africa
With support illustrates the geographical extent of the regions covered by Indian Ocean slave trade in Africa

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
3.0 People and Population 3.7 Population Distribution in Africa

(3 Lessons)
By the end of the sub- strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. explain factors influencing population distribution in Africa
  2. locate densely and sparsely populated areas on a map of Africa
  3. illustrate settlement patterns in Africa using diagrams
  4. appreciate patterns of population settlement in Africa
Learners are guided to:
  • carry out a library research in groups on factors influencing population distribution and do class presentation
  • use digital resources to establish areas that are densely and sparsely populated.
  • draw a map of Africa and indicate the densely and sparsely populated areas.
  1. Why do people settle in certain places and not others?
  2. Why does population distribution vary in different regions?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Learning to Learn as learners research factors influencing population distribution in Africa in groups
  • Communication as learners do class presentation of the research findings on factors influencing population distribution
  • Digital Literacy as learners use digital resources to establish densely and sparsely populated areas in Africa
  • Creativity draw a map of Africa and indicate the densely and sparsely populated areas
  • Self-efficacy as learners present in class factors influencing population distribution in Africa.
Values:
  • Unity as learners carry out a library research in groups, on factors influencing population distribution and do class presentation
  • Responsibility as learners draw a map of Africa and indicate the densely and sparsely populated areas
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Social cohesion as learners’ research in groups on factors influencing population distribution in Africa.
  • Self-esteem as learners do presentations in class on factors influencing population distribution in Africa.
  • Technology safety as learners use digital resources to establish settlement patterns
Link to other subjects:
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners research in groups on population distribution in Africa.
  • Computer Science as learners use digital resources to establish settlement patterns in Africa.
  • Visual Arts as learners design posters or models of settlement patterns.
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to explain factors influencing population distribution in Africa.  

Correctly and comprehensively explains factors influencing population

distribution in Africa.

 

Correctly  explains factors influencing population

distribution in Africa.

 

Moderately explains factors influencing population

distribution in Africa.

Has challenges explaining factors influencing population

distribution in Africa.

Ability to locate densely and sparsely populated areas on a
map of East Africa 
Correctly and creatively locates densely and sparsely
populated areas on a map of East Africa
Correctly locates densely and sparsely populated areas on a
map of East Africa
Partly locates some densely and sparsely populated areas on a
map of East Africa 
With support locates densely and sparsely populated areas on a
map of East Africa 
Ability illustrate settlement patterns in Africa using diagrams Correctly and creatively illustrate settlement patterns in Africa using diagrams Correctly illustrate settlement patterns in Africa using diagrams Incompletely illustrate settlement patterns in Africa using diagrams With assistance some illustrates some settlement patterns in Africa using diagrams

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
3.0 People and Population

3.8. Field Work


(5 lessons)

 By the end of the sub strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. identify types of field work in Social Studies
  2. analyse methods of data collection and recording in fieldwork
  3. examine methods of data analysis and presentation in field work
  4. explore challenges and solutions in carrying out field work
  5. apply procedures of carrying out fieldwork in research
  6. desire to carry out fieldwork in investigating phenomena
Learner is guided to:
  • use digital devices to find out types of fieldwork
  • discuss methods of data analysis and presentation
  • in groups, analyse and present the data collected during fieldwork and share in class discuss in groups challenges likely to be encountered during field work and possible solutions
  • use digital resources to research on the importance of field work
  • carry out field work to investigate phenomena within the immediate environment
  1. Why is field work important in social studies?
  2. How should we conduct fieldwork?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving as learners investigate challenges and solutions in carrying out fieldwork
  • Digital Literacy as learners use digital devices to find out types of fieldwork and as they research on the importance of fieldwork in Social Studies
  • Communication and Collaboration as learners discuss in groups challenges likely to be encountered during field work and possible solutions.
  • Learning to Learn as learners apply procedures of carrying out fieldwork.
Values:
  • Responsibility as learners carry out field work to investigate phenomena within the immediate environment
  • Unity as learners accomplish tasks as a group
  • Respect as learners recognize contributions of group members during discussions and as they engage with the resource person.
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Self-Esteem as learners analyse and present the data collected during fieldwork and share it in class
  • Problem Solving as learner investigate challenges and solutions in carrying out field work
  • Peer Education as learners analyse and present the data collected during fieldwork and share the information in class
Link to other subjects:
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners analyse and present the data collected during fieldwork and share in class.
  • Computer Science as learners use digital resources to find out types and importance of fieldwork.
  • Mathematics as learners analyze data collected from fieldwork
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to identify types of fieldwork in Social Studies Correctly and explicitly identifies types of field working Social
Studies
Correctly identifies types of field working Social
Studies
Moderately identifies types of fieldwork in Social Studies Requires assistance to identify types of fieldwork in Social
Studies
Ability to explore methods of data collection and recording in
fieldwork
Accurately and comprehensively explores methods of data collection and
recording in fieldwork
Accurately methods of data collection and
recording in fieldwork
Partially explores some methods of data collection and recording in
fieldwork
With support explores some methods of data collection and recording in
fieldwork
Ability to examine methods of data analysis and presentation to ease interpretation Correctly and exhaustively examines methods of data analysis and presentation to ease
interpretation
Correctly  examines methods of data analysis and presentation to ease
interpretation
Somewhat examines methods of data analysis and presentation to ease
interpretation
With assistance examines some methods of data analysis and presentation to ease
interpretation
Ability to investigate challenges and solutions in carrying out fieldwork Correctly and systematically investigates challenges and solutions in
carrying out fieldwork
Correctly investigates challenges and solutions in
carrying out fieldwork
Partially investigates challenges and solutions in
carrying out fieldwork
With support Investigates some challenges and solutions in carrying
out fieldwork

 STRAND 4.0: RESOURCES AND ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
4.0 Resources and Economic Activities 4.1
Agriculture

(3 Lessons)
By the end of the sub strand the learner should be able to:
  1. locate areas where early agriculture was practiced in selected geographical regions
  2. explore crops grown and animals kept in selected regions during early agriculture
  3. illustrate methods of irrigation used in ancient Egypt
  4. assess the contribution of the Nile valley agriculture to world civilization
  5. Value the importance of domestication of plant and animals in Africa
  6. develop desire to practice agriculture as an economic activity

Learners are guided to:

  • use appropriate digital devices and other sources to research in groups on areas where early agriculture was practiced in selected regions of the Rift Valley of Eastern African, Egypt and Nubia
  • carry out a research in groups on animals kept and types of crops which were grown during early agriculture in Egypt, Nubia and in Rift valley of the Eastern African region and report the findings to the class
  • in groups identify crops grown and animals which were kept during early agriculture in Egypt, Nubia and Rift Valley of the East African region
  • view video clips or photographs on methods of irrigation used in ancient Egypt
  • draw diagrams showing
    methods of irrigation which were used in ancient Egypt.
  • in groups discuss the contribution of the Nile valley agriculture to world civilization
  • collect/download pictures and photographs on different animals kept, crops grown in subsistence farming and methods of irrigation used during early agriculture in Egypt
  • establish a poster park on indigenous crops and animals during early agriculture which
    is accessible to the public.

Why did people start practicing agriculture in Africa?

 

Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Digital Literacy as learners use digital devices to research on areas where early agriculture was practiced in selected regions.
  • Critical Thinking as learners carry out a research on animals kept and types of crops which were grown during early agriculture in selected regions and report to the class
  • Communication as learners discuss the contribution of the Nile Valley agriculture to world civilization
  • Creativity as learners illustrate diagrams showing methods of irrigation which were used in ancient Egypt.  
Values:
  • Unity as learners research in groups on animals kept and types of crops grown during early agriculture
  • Patriotism as global citizens as learners assess the contribution of Nile valley agriculture to world civilization
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Social cohesion as learners work in groups to classify crops grown and animals which were kept during early agriculture
  • Environmental education as learners illustrates methods of irrigation which were used during early agriculture.    
Link to other subjects:
  • Agriculture as learners they learn about methods of irrigation.
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners engage in discussions to communicate issues concerning agriculture.
  • Visual Arts as learners draw diagrams showing methods of irrigation which were used during early agriculture in Egypt
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to locate areas where early agriculture was practiced in selected geographical regions Correctly and concisely locates areas where early agriculture was practiced in selected
geographical regions
Correctly locates areas where early agriculture was practiced in selected
geographical regions
Somewhat locates areas where early agriculture was practiced in selected
geographical regions
With support locates some areas where early agriculture was practiced in selected geographical regions
Ability to explore crops grown and animals kept in
selected regions during early agriculture
Correctly and explicitly explores crops grown and animals kept in
selected regions during early agriculture
Correctly explores crops grown and animals kept in
selected regions during early agriculture
Fairly explores some crops grown and animals kept in
selected regions during early agriculture

 With assistance explores some crops grown and animals
kept in selected regions during early agriculture

Ability to illustrate methods of irrigation used in ancient Egypt Correctly and distinctively illustrates methods of irrigation used in
ancient Egypt
Correctly illustrates methods of irrigation used in ancient Egypt Fairly illustrates methods of irrigation used in ancient Egypt Has challenges in illustrating methods of irrigation used in ancient Egypt
Ability to assess the contribution of Nile valley agriculture to world civilization Correctly and explicitly assesses the contribution of Nile valley agriculture to world civilization Correctly assesses the contribution of Nile valley agriculture to world civilization Partially assesses the contribution of Nile valley agriculture to world civilization With support assesses some of the contribution of Nile valley agriculture to world civilization

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
4.0
Resources and Economic Activities

4.2 Economic Organization of Selected African Communities up to 1900

(3 Lessons)

By the end of the sub strand the learner should be able to:
  1. locate on a map of Africa areas occupied by the selected African communities
  2. discuss the economic activities practiced by the selected African communities
  3. compare the economic activities of the selected African communities
  4. appreciate the economic activities of the selected African communities.
Learners are guided to:
  • draw a map of Africa and indicate areas occupied by selected African communities( The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante )
  • brainstorm, the economic activities practiced by the selected African communities ( The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante ) and present the findings in class.
  • make posters of economic activities practiced by the selected African communities( The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante ).
Why should we study economic activities of African communities up to 1900 today?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Communication and Collaboration as learners brainstorm, the economic activities practiced by the selected African communities ( The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante ) and present the information in class.
  • Creativity and Imagination as learners make posters of economic activities practiced by the selected African communities( The Ogiek, Zulu, Asante )
  • Self-efficacy as learners draw a map of Africa and indicate areas occupied by selected African communities 
Values:
  • Responsibility as learners make posters of economic activities practiced by the selected African communities
  • Unity as learners brainstorm on the economic activities practiced by the selected African Communities
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Social cohesion as learners brainstorm, the economic activities practiced by the selected African
  • Financial literacy as learners discuss the economic activities practiced by the selected African community
Link to other subjects:
  • Agriculture as learners learn about economic activities of the selected African communities
  • Business Studies as learners engage a resource person to discuss the economic activities of the selected African communities and write a report
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners engage in discussions on economic activities of the selected African communities
  • Visual Arts as learners draw a map of Africa and indicate areas occupied by selected African communities
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to locate on a map of Africa areas occupied by the selected African communities   Correctly and explicitly locates on a map of Africa areas occupied by the selected African
communities 
Correctly  locates on a map of Africa areas occupied by the selected African
communities 
Somewhat locates on a map of Africa some of the areas occupied by the selected African
communities
With assistance locates on a map of Africa some of the areas occupied by the selected African
communities  
Ability to discuss the economic activities practiced by the Ogiek, Zulu and the Asante. Correctly and comprehensively discusses the economic activities practiced by the Ogiek, Zulu and the
Asante.
Correctly discusses the economic activities practiced by the Ogiek, Zulu and the
Asante. 
Partially discusses economic some of the activities practiced by the Ogiek, Zulu and the Asante. With support discusses economic some of the activities practiced by the Ogiek, Zulu and the Asante.
Ability to compare economic activities of the selected African communities Correctly and exhaustively compares economic activities of the
selected African communities
Correctly compares economic activities of the
selected African communities
Somewhat compares economic activities of some of the selected African communities With assistance compares economic activities of some of the selected African communities

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
4.0 Resources and Economic Activities

4.3 Internal Dynamics and Transformation in Africa

(3 lessons)

By the end of the sub strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. explain the transformation brought by introduction of money in Africa
  2. discuss the use of money economy in trade
  3. compare the use of money in currency trade and barter trade in Africa
  4. develop interest to use money wisely for economic gain  
Learners are guided to:
  • debate on the transformation brought by introduction of money in Africa.
  • visit a nearby market and carry out a field study on the use money in trade and write a report.
  • brainstorm the impact of money on economy in groups of fire
  • role play use of money in currency trade and barter trade in Africa
How did the introduction of money economy promote business in Africa?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Citizenship as learners’ debate on the transformation brought by introduction of money in Africa.
  • Communication as learners’ debate on transformation brought by introduction of money in Africa.
  • Self-efficacy as learners role play use of money in currency trade and barter trade in Africa
  • Learning to Learn as learners carry out a field study on the use of money in trade and write a report
Values:
  • Responsibility as learners visit a nearby market and carry out a field study on the use of money in trade and write a report
  • Unity as learners’ role play use of money, currency trade and barter trade in Africa.
  • Integrity as learners practice trading activities in class using money.
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Financial literacy as learners discuss the impact of money on the economy
  • Social cohesion as learners role of the use of money in currency trade and barter trade in Africa
  • Safety and security education as learners visit a nearby market and carry out a field study on the use money in trade and write a report
Link to other subjects:
  • Business Studies as learners learn about introduction of money economy.
  • English, Kiswahili , Kenyan Sign Language and Indigenous Language as learners brainstorm in groups of four on impact of money on the economy
  • Performing Arts as learners role play use of money in currency trade and barter trade in Africa
  • Mathematics as learners role play use of money in currency trade and barter trade in Africa
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to explain the transformation brought by introduction of money in Africa Correctly and systematically explains the transformation brought by introduction of money
in Africa  
Correctly explains the transformation brought by introduction of money
in Africa  
Partially explains the transformation brought by introduction of money
in Africa
With support explains some of the transformation brought by introduction of money in Africa
Ability to discuss the use of money economy in trade  Correctly and comprehensively discusses the use of money economy in
trade 
Correctly discusses the use of money economy in trade   partially discusses the use of money economy in trade Has challenges discussing the use of money economy in trade
Ability to compare the use of money in currency trade and barter trade in Africa Correctly and exhaustively compares use of money in currency trade and barter trade
in Africa
Correctly compares use of money in currency trade and barter trade
in Africa
Fairly compares use of money in currency trade and barter trade
in Africa
With support compares use of money in currency trade and barter trade in Africa

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
4.0
Resources and Economic Activities
4.4. Sustainable use of resources

(2 lessons)
By the end of the sub strand the learner should be able to:
  1. discuss the concept of sustainable use of resources in society
  2. explore sustainable ways of using resources available in the community
  3. apply sustainable use of resources available in the community
  4. appreciate sustainable use of resources for sustenance of life.
Learners are guided to:
  • in groups discuss the concept of sustainable use of resources and present in class
  • in groups learners debate on sustainable ways of using resources available in the community
  • design sustainable ways of using resources available at home and in schoo
  • write a collaborative story on sustainable use of
resources  
  1. Why should we use resources sustainably?
  2. What are barriers to sustainable use of resources?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Communication and collaboration as learners in groups discuss the concept of sustainable use of resources and present in class
  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving as learners design sustainable ways of using resources available at home and in school
  • Creativity and Imagination as learners debate on sustainable ways of using resources available in the community and write a collaborative story on sustainable use of resources
Values:
  • Responsibility as learners design sustainable ways of using resources available at home and in school
  • Unity as learners in groups discuss the concept of sustainable use of resources andwrite a collaborative story on sustainable use of resources to present in class
  • Patriotism as learners design sustainable ways of using resources available at home and in school
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Poverty reduction as learners design sustainable ways of using resources available at home and in school
Link to other subjects:
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners engage in discussions on sustainable use of resources and present in class
  • Integrated Science as learners design sustainable ways of using resources available at home and in school
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to discuss the concept of sustainable use of resources in society   Correctly and comprehensively discusses the concept of sustainable use of
resources in society  
Correctly discusses the concept of sustainable use of
resources in society
 Moderately discusses the concept of sustainable use of
resources in society  
With support discusses the concept of sustainable use of
resources in society
Ability to explore sustainable ways of using resources available in the community  Correctly and systematically explores sustainable ways of using resources
available in the community 
Correctly explores sustainable ways of using resources
available in the community 
Fairly explores some sustainable ways of using resources available in the community   With assistance explores some sustainable ways of using resources available in the
community

STRAND 5.0: POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT AND GOVERNANCE

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
5.0 Political
Development and Governance
5.1 Political Development in Africa up to 1900
(5 Lessons)
By the end of the sub- strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. investigate the political organization of the selected African communities up to 1900
  2. discuss the concepts “Scramble for and Partition” of Africa
  3. identify the various European groups that came to Africa.
  4. Explain factors that led to the presence of Europeans in Africa.
  5. match the countries in Africa with their colonial masters
  6. examine the terms of the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885 on the partitioning of Africa
  7. acknowledge the political organization of the selected African communities up to 1900
 

Learner is guided to:

  • brainstorm the political organization of the Ogiek, the Zulu and the Asante up to 1900.
  • brainstorm in groups the the terms “Scramble for and Partition of Africa and make presentations
  • Discuss the various European groups that came to Africa
  • Debate on factors that led to the presence of Europeans in Africa.
  • draw a map of Africa and indicate the areas taken up by the different European countries(Belgium, Britain, Germany, Italy
    , Spain and Portugal)during the partition of Africa
  • using posters display in class the terms of the Berlin conference of 1884-1885 on the
    partitioning of Africa.

 

 

  1. How were African communities politically organized before the coming of the Europeans?
  2. How did developments in Europe influence the scramble and partition of Africa?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Citizenship as learners identify with their country and the continent as they study the selected African communities and brainstorm the political organization of the Ogiek, the Zulu and the Asante up to 1900.
  • Communication and Collaboration as the learners work in groups during group research and on political organization of selected African communities
  • Self-efficacy as the learners use posters display in class the terms of the Berlin conference of 1884-1885 on the partitioning of Africa.
  • Learning to Learn as the learners debate on factors that led to the presence of Europeans in Africa.
  • Creativity and Imagination as learners draw a map of Africa and indicate the areas taken up by the different European countries(Belgium, Britain, Germany, Italy , Spain and Portugal)during the partition of Africa
Values:
  • Patriotism as the learners study the selected African Communities
  • Unity as the learners brainstorm the political organization of the Ogiek, the Zulu and the Asante up to 1900.
  • Responsibility as learners use posters display in class the terms of the Berlin conference of 1884-1885 on the partitioning of Africa.
  • Respect as learners consider the opinion of each other as they brainstorm on political organizations of the Ogiek, the Zulu and the Asante up to 1900 and Debate on factors that led to the presence of Europeans in Africa.   
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Self-Awareness as the learners identify with their country and the continent as they study the selected African  communities and brainstorm the political organization of the Ogiek, the Zulu and the Asante up to 1900.
  • Good governance as the learners brainstorm the political organization of the Ogiek, the Zulu and the Asante up to 1900.
  • Social Cohesion as learners discuss the various European groups that came to Africa   

Link to other subjects:

  • Kenyan Sign Language, English and Kiswahili as learner debate on factors that led to the presence of Europeans in Africa.
  • Visual Arts as the learners draw a map of Africa and indicate the areas taken up by the different European countries (Belgium, Britain, Germany, Italy, Spain and Portugal) during the partition of Africa and use posters display in class the terms of the Berlin conference of 1884-1885 on the partitioning of Africa.
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to investigate the political organisation of the selected African communities up to 1900  Accurately and exhaustively and investigates the political organisation of the selected African communities up to
1900.
Accurately  investigates the political organisation of the selected African communities up to
1900.
Partially investigates the political organisation of the selected African communities up to
1900
With support investigates the political organisation of the selected African communities up to
1900.
Ability to discuss the concepts “Scramble for and Partition” of Africa  Correctly and comprehensively discusses the concepts “Scramble for and Partition” of Africa Correctly discusses the concepts “Scramble for and Partition” of Africa   Moderately discusses the concepts “Scramble for and Partition” of Africa  

Has challenges discussing the concepts “Scramble for and Partition” of Africa

 

 
Ability to identify the various European groups that came to Africa. Correctly and exhaustively identifies the various European groups that came to Africa. Correctly identifies the various European groups that came to Africa. Partly fairly identifies the various European groups that came to Africa. With support identifies some of the various the various European groups that came to
Africa.
Ability to match the countries in Africa with their colonial masters Correctly and profoundly matches the countries in Africa with their colonial
masters
Correctly matches the countries in Africa with their colonial
masters
Partly matches the countries in Africa with their colonial masters With assistance matching some of the countries in Africa with their
colonial masters
Ability to examine the terms of the Berlin Conference of 1884-85 on the partitioning of Africa Correctly and Comprehensively examines the terms of the of the Berlin Conference of 1884-85 on the partitioning of
Africa
Correctly examines the terms of the of the Berlin Conference of 1884-85 on the partitioning of
Africa
Moderately examines the terms of the Berlin Conference of 1884-85 on the partitioning of Africa With support examines some of the terms of the Berlin Conference of 1884-85 on the partitioning of Africa

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
5.0 Political
Development and Governance

5.2 The
Constitution of Kenya

(3 Lessons)

By the end of the sub- strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. discuss the importance of the Constitution of Kenya for mutual social wellbeing
  2. explore the national values as provided in the Constitution of Kenya for promotion of good governance
  3. analyze ways of upholding and protecting the Constitution of Kenya for social cohesion
  4. develop desire to uphold and protect the Constitution of Kenya for promotion of ethical and responsible citizenship
Learning Outcomes Suggested Learning Experiences Key Inquiry Questions
 Learners are guided to:
  • use print or digital devices in groups to conduct an online research and write a report on the importance of the Constitution and share in class
  • view a video on the promulgation of the Constitution of Kenya
  • design a sample constitution for the class in groups and display in class
  • write simple slogans or statements on any eight of the national values as provided in the Constitution of Kenya for promotion of good governance present
  • discuss in groups ways of upholding and protecting the constitution of Kenya
  1. Why should a country have a constitution?
  2. Why should we uphold and protect the Constitution?
  3. What necessitates a constitutional change?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Citizenship as learners view a video on the promulgation of the Constitution of Kenya and create a sample constitution for the class in groups and display in class
  • Self-efficacy as learners compose a song on any eight national values enshrined in the Constitution and work in groups.
  • Learning to Learn as learners research in the local community on the importance of the Constitution of Kenya to the society and share the finding findings with the school community
  • Digital Literacy as learners in groups use digital devices to conduct online research and write an essay on the importance of the Constitution and share in class.
Values:
  • Respect as learners create a sample constitution for the class in groups and display in class
  • Patriotism as learners watch a video on the promulgation of the Constitution of Kenya and compose a song on any eight national values enshrined in the Constitution
  • Social justice as learners discuss in groups on ways of upholding and protecting the Constitution of Kenya
  • Responsibility as learners work in groups, and research in community on the importance of the Constitution of Kenya to the society and share the findings in school
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Social cohesion as learners in groups conduct online research and write an essay on the importance of the Constitution, watch a video on the promulgation of the Constitution of Kenya, and create a sample constitution for the class in groups and display in class
  • Good governance as learners organize an open forum as a class to pass messages on public engagement and democratic representation to the community   
Link to other subjects:
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners hold discussions, group activities, write essays, and create a class constitution.
  • Performing Arts as learners compose songs, write slogans and make presentations in class and community.
  • Computer Science as learners use digital devices to search for information such as conducting online research and writing an essay on the importance of the Constitution
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to discuss the importance of the Constitution of Kenya for mutual social wellbeing   Correctly and exhaustively discusses the importance of the Constitution of Kenya
for mutual social wellbeing 
Correctly discusses the importance of the Constitution of Kenya
for mutual social wellbeing 
Partially discusses the importance of the Constitution of Kenya for mutual social wellbeing   With support discusses the importance of the Constitution of
Kenya for mutual social wellbeing 
Ability to explore the national values as provided in the Constitution of Kenya for promotion of good governance   Accurately and comprehensively explores the national values as provided in the Constitution of Kenya for promotion of good governance   Accurately explores the national values as provided in the Constitution of Kenya for promotion of good governance    omehow explores the national values as provided in the Constitution of Kenya for promotion of good governance  With assistance explores some of the national values as provided in the Constitution of Kenya for promotion of good
governance
Ability to analyse ways of upholding and protecting the Constitution of Kenya for social
cohesion
Correctly and explicitly analyses ways of upholding and protecting the Constitution of Kenya
for social cohesion
Correctly analyses ways of upholding and protecting the Constitution of Kenya for social cohesion Moderately analyses ways of upholding and protecting the Constitution of Kenya for social cohesion

With support analyses some ways of upholding and protecting the Constitution of
Kenya for social cohesion

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
5.0 Political
Development and Governance
5.3
Democracy

(3 lessons)
By the end of the sub- strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. identify types of democracy practiced in Africa
  2. assess the importance of democracy in society
  3. explain the role of citizens in democratic representation
  4. examine the characteristics of various types of democracy in governance
  5. apply democratic values in interactions with others in the community
  6. desire to promote democratic values in the community. 
Learners are guided to:
  • role play the different types of democracy
  • brainstorm in on the importance of democracy.
  • debate on the role of citizens in effective democratic representation
  • use print or digital devices to identify characteristics of various types of democracy in governance
  • develop a poster on similarities and differences on various types of democracy and display in class or school
  • Brainstorm in class ways of applying democratic values during interaction with others in the community. 
  1. Why should we practice democracy?
  2. How can we promote democratic values in our society?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Citizenship as learners debate on the role of the citizens in effective democratic representation, brainstorm the importance of democracy and apply democratic values in interactions with others in the community.
  • Collaboration as learners brainstorm the importance of democracy.
  • Learning to Learn as learners conduct research on public engagement and democratic representation and share results in class or with the community
  • Digital Literacy as learners use online resources to use digital devices to identify characteristics of types of democratic regimes in Africa and as they type an essay on types of democracy in Africa.
  • Critical thinking as learners discuss the role of citizens in a democracy and compare, and contrast the characteristics of various types of democracy in Africa.
Values:
  • Unity as learners role play the different types of democracy.
  • Patriotism as learners debate on the role of the citizen in effective democratic representation.
  • Social justice as learners debate on the role of the citizens in effective democratic representation.
  • Respect for self and others as learners work in groups, debate and apply democratic principles as they interact with others.
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Social cohesion as learners discuss and debate the role of citizens in effective democratic governance.
  • Good governance as learners apply democratic values in interactions with others in the community and discuss the importance of democracy in society.
  • Self-awareness as learners discuss the role of citizens to ensure effective democratic representation and work in groups.
Link to other subjects:
  • Kenyan Sign Language, English and Kiswahili as learners hold discussions, group activities, write essays and debates and read materials on democracy.
  • Performing Arts as learners role-play the different types of democracy
  • Computer Science as they use digital devices to search for information such as to identify characteristics of types of democratic regimes in Africa
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to identify types of democracy in Africa Accurately and comprehensively
identifies types of democracy in Africa 
Accurately 
identifies types of democracy in Africa 
Fairly
identifies types of democracy in Africa
With support some identifies types of democracy in Africa
Ability to assess the importance of democracy in Africa Correctly and explicitly assesses the importance of democracy in Africa  Correctly assesses the importance of democracy in Africa  Partially assesses the importance of democracy in Africa   Has challenges assessing the importance of
democracy in Africa
Ability to explain the role of the citizens in democratic
representation
Correctly and exhaustively explains the role of the citizens in democratic
representation
Correctly  explains the role of the citizens in democratic
representation
Moderately explains the roles of citizens in democratic representation Has difficulties explaining the role of the citizens in democratic
representation
Ability to examine the characteristics of
various types of democracy in Africa
Accurately and exceptionally examines
the characteristics of various types of democracy in Africa
Accurately examines
the characteristics of democracy in Africa
Somewhat examines some characteristics
of various types of democracy in Africa
With assistance examines some
characteristics of various types of democracy in Africa

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
5.0 Political
Development and Governance
5.4 Human
Rights (4 lessons)
 By the end of the sub-strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. examine the evolution of human rights as practiced in society
  2. classify human rights as stipulated in the human rights instruments
  3. explore characteristics of human rights in society
  4. analyze the concept of equity and non- discrimination in fostering solidarity
  5. take action to promote equity and non- discrimination for posterity
  6. demonstrate respect , adherence to and promotion of human rights for sanctity of life.
Learners are guided to:
  • use print or digital resources to examine evolution of human rights and report in class
  • in groups create posters on the classification of human rights and display in school
  • in groups use a tree to indicate characteristics of human rights and display in class
  • brainstorm in groups on issues of equity and non-discrimination
  • develop posters on equity and non- discrimination and display them in school
  1. Why is it important to know our rights?
  2. How can we promote equity and non- discrimination in society?
  3. How can we promote respect for human rights in our community?

 

 
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Citizenship as learners use print or digital resources to examine evolution of human rights and report in class and develop posters on equity and non- discrimination and display them in school
  • Learning to Learn as learners brainstorm in groups on issues of equity and non-discrimination
  • Digital Literacy as learners use digital resources to examine evolution of human rights and report in class
  • Creativity and Imagination as learners develop posters on characteristics of human rights and display them in school to pass on information to the community
  • Communication and Collaboration as learners in groups create posters on the classification of human rights and display in school and use a tree to indicate characteristics of human rights and display in class
  • Self-Efficacy as learners Develop posters on equity and non- discrimination and display them in school
Values:
  • Social justice as learners use digital resources to examine evolution of human rights and report in class and develop posters on equity and non- discrimination and display them in school
  • Unity as learners in groups create posters on the classification and use a tree to indicate characteristics of human rights and display in class
  • Patriotism as learners Create posters on the classification of human rights and display in school
  • Develop Respect as the learners recognise the input of every member of the team during the symposium
  • Responsibility as learners in groups create posters on the classification and characteristics of human rights and display in school
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Social Cohesion as learners organize and participate in commemorating International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on 21st March
  • Good Governance as learners engage in commemorating International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on 21st March
  • Assertiveness, negotiation, problem solving as learners develop posters on equity and non- discrimination and display them in school
  • Clubs and societies as learners brainstorm issues of equity and non-discrimination during clubs such as human rights club, journalism club and Amani club
  • Human rights as learners compose and recite poems with messages on equity and non- discrimination
Link to other subjects:
  • Computer Science as learners use digital resources as they examine evolution of human rights and report in class
  • Kenyan Sign Language, Kiswahili and English as learners use print resources to examine evolution of human rights and report in class and organize and participate in a human rights symposium
  • Performing Arts as learners conduct debates during club meetings on ways of ensuring equity through enhancing access, equal opportunities and equitable distribution of resources
  • Visual Arts as learners develop posters on equity and non- discrimination and display them in school
  • Hindu Religious Education, Islamic Religious Education and Christian Religious Education as learners brainstorm issues of equity and non-discrimination
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to examine the evolution of Human Rights as practiced in society  Accurately and comprehensively examines the evolution of Human Rights as
practiced in society
Accurately examines the evolution of Human Rights as practiced
in society
Moderately examines the evolution of Human Rights as practiced
in society
With assistance examines the evolution of Human Rights as practiced
in society
Ability to classify Human Rights as stipulated in the Human Rights
instruments 
Correctly and exhaustively classifies Human Rights as stipulated in the Human
Rights instruments 
Correctly classifies Human Rights as stipulated in the Human Rights
instruments  
Fairly classifies Human Rights as stipulated in the Human Rights
instruments
Has challenges classifying Human Rights as stipulated in the Human Rights
instruments 
Ability to explore the characteristics of Human Rights as practiced for preservation of life Correctly and explicitly explores the characteristics of Human Rights as practiced for preservation of life Correctly explores the characteristics of Human Rights as practiced for
preservation of life
Somewhat explores the characteristics of Human Rights as practiced for
preservation of life
With assistance explores some characteristics of Human Rights as practiced for
preservation of life
Ability to analyse the concept of equity and non-discrimination in fostering solidarity Correctly and comprehensively analyses the concept of equity and non-
discrimination in fostering solidarity
Correctly analyses the concept of equity and non- discrimination in fostering solidarity Partially analyses the concept of equity and non- discrimination in fostering solidarity With support analyses the concept of equity and non- discrimination in fostering solidarity

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
5.0 Political
Development and Governance
5.5 African
Diasporas (4 Lessons)
By the end of the sub- strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. describe the concept of “African Diasporas”
  2. explore the factors that contributed to the presence of African diasporas across the world
  3. locate on the world map countries inhabited by African Diasporas on the World map.
  4. assess the role of the diasporas in the political development in Africa.
  5. Acknowledge the African diasporas for promotion of African unity in society today 
Learners are guided to:
  • with the aid of print or internet resources, discuss in groups the concept of African diasporas
  • use library resources in groups to research on the factors that contributed presence of African diasporas across the world and share findings in class
  • in groups , use print or digital resources to indicate on the world map countries inhabited by African diasporas
  • view a video or You- Tube on the role of diaspora in the political development in Africa
  • debate on the role of the diasporas in the political development in Africa
  1. How can we promote collaboration between continental Africans and African Diasporas?
  2. How can we promote African Unity in the society today? 
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Communication and Collaboration as learners in groups , use print or digital resources to indicate on the world map countries inhabited by African diasporas
  • Digital Literacy as learners use print or digital resources to locate on the world map countries inhabited by African diasporas and view a video or You- Tube on the role of diaspora in the political development in Africa
  • Critical Thinking as learners in groups use library resources to research on the factors that contributed to the movement of African diasporas to various parts of the world and share findings in class
  • Citizenship as learners debate on the role of diaspora in the political development in Africa
  • Learning to Learn as learners with the aid of print or internet resources, discuss in groups the concept of African diasporas
Values:
  • Social Justice as learners view a video or You- Tube on the role of diaspora in the political development in Africa
  • Patriotism as learners debate on the role of diaspora in the political development in Africa
  • Respect as learners in groups , use print or digital resources to indicate on the world map countries inhabited by African diasporas
  • Unity as learners in groups use print or digital resources to locate on the world map countries inhabited by African diasporas and the key routes of their migration from Africa
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Critical Thinking as learners in groups , use print or digital resources to indicate on the world map countries inhabited by African diasporas
  • Social Cohesion as learners debate on the role of diaspora in the political development in Africa
  • Self-Esteem as learners use print or digital resources to locate on the world map countries inhabited by African diasporas
Link to other subjects:
  • Kenyan Sign Language ,English and Kiswahili as leaners debate on the role of diaspora in the political development in Africa
  • Computer Science as learners view a video or You- Tube on the role of diaspora in the political development in Africa
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to describe the concept of “African diasporas” Correctly and comprehensively describes the concept of “African diasporas”  Correctly describes the concept of “African diasporas” Partially describes the concept of “African diasporas” With assistance describes the concept of “African diasporas” 
Ability to explore the factors that contributed to the presence of African diasporas across the world  Correctly and comprehensively explores the factors which contributed to the presence of African diasporas across the
world 
Correctly explores the factors which contributed to the presence of African diasporas across the
world
Fairly explores some of the factors which contributed to the presence of African diasporas across the world  With support explores some of the factors that contributed to the presence of African diasporas across the
world 
Ability to locate on the world map countries inhabited by African Diasporas Correctly and concisely locates on the world map countries inhabited by African
diasporas.
Correctly locates on the world map countries inhabited by African
diasporas.
Somewhat locates on the world map some of the countries inhabited by African
diasporas.
With assistance locates on the world map some of the countries inhabited by
African diasporas.
Ability to assess the role of the diasporas in the political development in Africa. Correctly and exhaustively assesses the role of the diasporas in the political development
in Africa.
Correctly assesses the role of the diaspora in the political development in
Africa.
Partially assesses the role of the diaspora in the political development in
Africa.
Has challenges assessing the role of the diasporas in the political development in Africa.

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
5.0 Political Development and Governance 5.6 Global Citizenship

(3 Lessons)
By the end of the sub-strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. explain why there is interconnectedness and interdependence among countries in the world today
  2. investigate positive and negative effects of globalization at local and national levels
  3. describe qualities of a global citizen in the modern society
  4. desire to contribute to the wellbeing of the international community while maintaining a sense of rootedness to Kenya
  5. develop a sense of belonging to a common humanity for harmonious living.
Learners are guided to:
  • discuss in groups the interconnectedness and interdependence among countries in the world today
  • in groups, go through and read news articles in newspapers or use appropriate media to find out aspects that promote globalization in the community and share the information in class
  • debate on positive and negative effects of globalization at local and national levels
  • brainstorm on the qualities of a global citizen in the modern society
  • use print or digital resources to research for qualities of a global citizen and write them down
  • draw a sketch of a human figure and indicate qualities of a global citizen.
  1. How do countries connect and depend on each other in the world today?
  2. Which are the common concerns in the world today?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Citizenship as learners discuss in groups the interconnectedness and interdependence among countries and brainstorm on the qualities of a global citizen in the world today
  • Communication and Collaboration as learners debate on positive and negative effects of globalization at local and national levels
  • Learning to Learn as they go through and read news articles in newspapers and use appropriate media to find out aspects that promote globalization in the community, share the information in class and debate on the positive and negative effects of globalization
  • Self-Efficacy as learners use print or digital resources to research for qualities of a global citizen and write them down. 
Values:
  • Unity as learners in groups, go through and read news articles in newspapers or use appropriate media to find out aspects that promote globalization in the community and share the information in class
  • Patriotism as the learners brainstorm on the qualities of a global citizen in the modern society
  • Respect as the learners debate on positive and negative effects of globalization at local and national levels
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Good Governance as brainstorm on the qualities of a global citizen in the modern society
  • Problem Solving as learners debate on positive and negative effects of globalization at local and national levels and propose solutions
  • Self-Awareness as learners use print or digital resources to research for qualities of a global citizen and write them down.
Link to other subjects:
  • Computer Science as learners use use print or digital resources to research for qualities of a global citizen and write them down.
  • Kenyan Sign Language, English, indigenous languages and Kiswahili as learners debate on positive and negative effects of globalization at local and national levels and propose solutions
  • Visual Arts as learners draw a sketch of a human figure and indicate qualities of a global citizen
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to discuss the interconnectedness and interdependence of different countries 

Correctly and comprehensively discusses the interconnectedness and interdependence

of different countries

Correctly discusses the interconnectedness and interdependence of different countries  Moderately discusses the interconnectedness and interdependence of different countries With support to discusses the interconnectedness and interdependence of different countries
Ability to investigate positive and negative effects of globalization Correctly and exhaustively investigates positive and negative effects of globalization at
local and national levels
Correctly investigates positive and negative effects of globalization at local and national levels Partially investigates positive and negative effects of globalization at local and national levels   With assistance investigates positive and negative effects of globalization at local and national levels
Ability to describe qualities of a global citizen in the modern society Correctly and explicitly describes qualities of a global citizen in the modern society Correctly describes qualities of a global citizen in the modern society  Fairly describes qualities of a global citizen in the modern society  With assistance describes some qualities of a global citizen in the modern society 


COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING (CSL) PROJECT

The CSL project is based on sustainable use of resources and global citizenship. The project seeks to provide an opportunity for learners to apply the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values acquired to address an environmental challenge in the community. The project selected should culminate in helping the learner promote sustainable use of available resources in the community. Additionally, it should provide the learner with the opportunity to participate in solving an environmental challenge in the community as a global citizen. Learners are encouraged to undertake the project in groups to promote acquisition of core competencies and values.

  1. Meaningful Learning Experience Created
    Application of concepts learnt in class to address an environmental challenge in the community.
  2. Integration of Learning and Community Service
    Application of concepts learnt in class will help to address an environmental challenge in the community which is also a global concern. Stakeholder mobilization and engagement will ensure sustainability of the project and replication of the same in other communities.
Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
  1. Resources and economic activities
  2. Political Development and Governance
  • Sustainable use of Resources
  • Global Citizenship
• By the end of the project cycle, the learner should be able to:
  1. identify an environmental challenge affecting the community
  2. plan a project to address the environmental challenge in the community
  3. apply the knowledge on sustainable development and global citizenship to address the environmental challenge affecting the community
  4. appraise the project in terms of benefits to the community and deepening learning
  5. evaluate the implementation of the project in relation to its outcomes
  6. appreciate the impact of CSL project in addressing the environmental challenge in the community
Learners are guided to:
  • Brainstorm on environmental challenges affecting the community
  • research on environmental challenges affecting the community and share their findings in class
  • conduct civic dialogue with community members on environmental challenges and vote for one that they can address through a CSL project
  • plan on how to implement the CSL project in groups, taking into consideration the following:
    • Identify the project title
    • Purpose of the project and time frame
    • Share responsibilities on implementation of the project
    • Identify individuals, institutions and organizations they can partner with in the project
    • Identify and acquire relevant resources or materials for the project
  • learners work in groups to undertake the environmental project in the community
  • develop slogans, posters, street plays or communication messages to share experiences on the implementation of the project in relation to concepts learnt in sustainable development and global citizenship
  • share their experiences on the implementation and impact of the project in the community through social media
  • discuss how the project has helped learners to acquire in terms of research, life skills, leadership, Citizenship, Community development and Social entrepreneurship
  1. How can we promote sustainable development in our community?
  2. How do local challenges affect the global society?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Citizenship as learners conduct civic dialogue with community members on environmental challenges and vote for one that they can address through a CSL project
  • Communication and Collaboration as learners work in groups to undertake the environmental project in then community and brainstorm environmental challenges affecting the community
  • Self-Efficacy as learners develop slogans , posters , street plays or communication messages to share experiences on the implementation of the project in relation to concepts learnt in sustainable development and global citizenship
  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving as learners plan on how to implement the CSL project in groups.
  • Creativity and Imagination as learners identify and acquire relevant resources or materials for the project
  • Digital literacy as learners share their experiences on the implementation and impact of the project in the community through social media
Values:
  • Responsibility as learners share responsibilities on the implementation of the project
  • Patriotism as learners conduct civic dialogue with community members on environmental challenges and vote for one that they can address through a CSL project
  • Respect as learners work in groups to undertake the environmental project in the community
  • Unity as learners work in groups to undertake the environmental project in the community
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Community and stakeholder mobilization as learners conduct civic dialogue with community members on environmental challenges and vote for one that they can address through a CSL project
  • Information technology safety as learners share their experiences on the implementation and impact of the project in the community through social media
  • Social Cohesion as learners conduct civic dialogue with community members on environmental challenges and vote for one that they can address through a CSL project
  • Environmental Education as learners research on environmental challenges affecting the community and share their findings in class
  • Self-awareness as learners share their experiences on the implementation and impact of the project in the community through social media
  • Problem Solving as learners work in groups to undertake the environmental project in the community
Link to other subjects:
  • Kenyan Sign Language, English, indigenous languages and Kiswahili as learnersdevelop slogans, posters, street plays or communication messages to share experiences on the implementation of the project in relation to concepts learnt in sustainable use of resources and global citizenship
  • Computer Science as learners share their experiences on the implementation and impact of the project in the community through social media.
  • Visual Arts as learners develop slogans, posters, street plays or communication messages to share experiences on the implementation of the project
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to identify an environmental challenge affecting the community  Correctly and concisely identifies an environmental challenge affecting
the community 
Correctly identifies an environmental challenge affecting the community Partly identifies an environmental challenge affecting the community  With challenges identifies an environmental challenge affecting
the community
Ability to apply the knowledge on sustainable use of resources and global citizenship to address the environmental challenge affecting the community  Correctly and creatively applies the knowledge on sustainable use of resources t and global citizenship to address the environmental challenge affecting
the community  
Correctly applies the knowledge on sustainable use of resources and global citizenship to address the environmental challenge affecting the community Somewhat applies some knowledge on sustainable use of resources and global citizenship to address the environmental challenge affecting the community With support applies some knowledge on sustainable use of resources and global citizenship to address the environmental challenge affecting the community
Ability to appraise the project in terms of benefits to the community and deepening learning Correctly and comprehensively appraises the project in terms of benefits to the community and
deepening learning
Correctly appraises the project in terms of benefits to the community and deepening learning Moderately appraises the project in terms of benefits to the community and deepening learning With assistance appraises the project in terms of benefits to the community and deepening learning
Ability to evaluate the implementation of the project in relation to its outcomes Correctly and elaborately evaluates the implementation of the project in relation
to its outcomes
Correctly evaluates the implementation of the project in relation to its outcomes Fairly evaluates the implementation of the project in relation to its outcomes Has challenges evaluating the implementation of the project in relation to
its outcomes

 

Strand   Sub-strand   Specific Learning Outcomes   Suggested Learning Experiences  Key Inquiry Question(s) 
5.0 Political Development and Governance 5.8. Global Governance

(4 Lessons)
By the end of the sub-strand, the learner should be able to:
  1. identify the guiding principles of leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance
  2. examine the formation, achievements and challenges of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) and African Union (AU)
  3. State the member countries of the African Union
  4. illustrate the organizational structure of the African Union(AU)
  5. explore factors which can promote continental interconnectedness and interdependence
  6. develop a sense of belonging to Africa and respect for differences and diversity.
 Learners are guided to:
  • role-play on the guiding principles of good leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance
  • prepare slogans on the guiding principles of good leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance
  • sing the AU anthem for promotion of regional citizenship
  • use digital or print media resources to research on the formation, achievements and challenges of OAU and AU
  • draw a map of Africa and indicate member countries of the AU use print , media and other resources to  search for the national flags of the member countries of AU and make a collage and share the information in class
  • use print or digital resources to access the AU anthem, rehearse and Sing it
  • draw the organizational structure of OAU and AU
  • brainstorm in groups on factors which can promote continental interconnectedness and interdependence
  1. How should leadership and integrity be promoted in the society today?
  2. How can we promote continental interconnectedness and interdependence?
Core Competencies to be developed:
  • Communication and Collaboration as the learners role-play on the guiding principles of good leadership and integrity
  • Citizenship as learners draw a map of Africa and indicate member states of AU , use print or media and other resources to search for the national flags of the member countries of AU , make a collage and share the information in class
  • Learning to Learn as the learners use digital or print media resources to research on the formation, achievements and challenges of OAU and AU
  • Self-Efficacy as the learners role-play on the guiding principles of good leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance
  • Digital literacy as learners use media and other resources to search for the national flags of the member states of AU and make a collage to share in class
Values:
  • Love as learners sing the AU Anthem
  • Respect as learners debate on how leadership is essential in promoting good governance
  • Integrity as role-play on the guiding principles of good leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance
  • Patriotism as the learners use print or media resources to search for the national flags of the member countries of AU and make a collage to share in class
  • Social Justice as learners prepare slogans on the guiding principles of good leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance
Pertinent and Contemporary Issues (PCIs):
  • Social Cohesion as learners use print or media resources to search for the national flags of the member countries of AU and make a collage to share in class
  • Decisions Making as learners prepare slogans on the guiding principles of good leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance
  • Good governance as they prepare slogans on guiding principles and benefits of leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance.
Link to other subjects:
  • English, Kiswahili and Kenyan Sign Language as learners role-play on the guiding principles of good leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance and brainstorm in groups on factors which can promote continental interconnectedness and interdependence
  • Performing Arts as learners role-play on the guiding principles of good leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance and sing the AU Anthem
  • Visual Arts as learners use print or media resources to search for the national flags of the member countries of AU and make a collage to share in class
  • Computer Science as learners use use digital resources to research on the formation, achievements and challenges of OAU and AU
Assessment Rubric    
Indicator Exceeds Expectation Meets Expectation  Approaches expectation Below Expectation
Ability to identify the guiding principles of leadership and integrity in promotion of good global
governance 
Correctly and concisely identifies guiding principles of leadership and integrity in promotion of good
governance
Correctly identifies guiding principles of leadership and integrity in promotion of good
governance
Fairly identifies guiding principles of leadership and integrity in promotion of good governance With assistance identifies some guiding principles of leadership and integrity in promotion
of good governance 
Ability to examine the formation, achievements and challenges of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) and African Union (AU) Accurately and comprehensively examines the formation, achievements and challenges of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) and
African Union (AU) 
Accurately examines the formation, achievements and challenges of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) and African Union (AU) Moderately examines the formation, achievements and challenges of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) and African Union (AU) With support examines the formation, achievements and challenges of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) and African Union
(AU)
Ability to state the member countries of the African Union Correctly and exhaustively states the member countries of
the African Union
Correctly states the member countries of
the African Union
Fairly states some of the member countries of the African Union With assistance states some of the member countries of the
African Union
Ability to illustrate
the organizational structure of the AU
Correctly and skillfully
illustrates the organizational structure of the AU
Correctly illustrates
the organizational structure of the AU
Somewhat illustrates
the organizational structure of the AU
With support
illustrates the organizational structure of the AU
Ability to explore factors which can promote continental interconnectedness and interdependence Correctly and comprehensively explores factors which can promote continental interconnectedness and
interdependence
Correctly explores factors which can promote continental interconnectedness and interdependence Moderately explores factors which can promote continental interconnectedness and interdependence

With assistance explores some factors which can promote continental interconnectedness
and interdependence

APPENDIX 1: TABLE SHOWING: SUGGESTED ASSESSMENT METHODS, SUGGESTED LEARNING RESOURCES AND NON FORMAL ACTIVITIES

Strand  Sub Strand  Suggested assessment methods  Suggested Learning Resources  Non formal activities 
1.0 Social Studies  1.1 Career and Entrepreneurial Opportunities in Social Studies
  1. Oral Questions
  2. Teacher made tests
  3. Observation
  4. Portfolio
  5. Anecdotal Records
  6. Checklist
  • Approved textbooks and other printed resources
  • Photographs, pictures
  • Vetted digital resources
  • Library
  • TV/video/films/slides/ Internet sources
  • Display boards
  • Develop class and rules that discourage gender stereotypes in clubs
  • Hold peer led symposia on careers and entrepreneurial opportunities in Social Studies
  • Participate in talks by resource persons about prevention of gender stereotypes associated with careers,
  • Participate in mentorship and job shadowing sessions on Social Studies careers and entrepreneurial opportunities in Social Studies
  • Participate in sensitization sessions on career choices during career education weeks in schools
  • develop simple guidelines on respecting gender identity during clubs and societies meetings
  • develop communication messages and have talking walls with slogans on gender equity and careers
  • Initiate and develop class and club rules that discourage gender stereotypes in career choices.
2.0 Natural and Built Environments In Africa    2.1 Maps and Map work
  1. Oral Questions
  2. Teacher made tests
  3. Observation
  4. Portfolio
  5. Anecdotal Records
  6. Checklist
  • Local and extended environment
  • Realia
  • Maps/Globe
  • Photographs, pictures and paintings
  • Vetted digital resources, educational computer games
  • Approved textbooks and other printed resources
  • Library
  • TV/video/films/slides/ Internet sources
  • Display boards
  • Drawing a sketch map of the school compound
2.2 The earth
  1. Oral Questions
  2. Teacher made tests
  3. Observation
  4. Portfolio
  5. Project Work
  • Local and extended environment
  • Realia
  • Maps/globe
  • Photographs, pictures and paintings
  • Internet sources
  • Vetted digital resources, educational computer games
  • Approved textbooks and other printed resources
  • Making a model of the internal structure of the earth
2.3 Weather
  1. Oral Questions
  2. Teacher made tests
  3. Observation
  4. Project Work
  5. Portfolio
  6. Anecdotal records
  7. Checklists
  • Local and extended environment
  • Realia
  • Maps
  • Photographs, pictures and paintings
  • Vetted digital resources, educational computer games
  • Approved textbooks and other printed resources
  • TV/video/films/slides/ Internet source
  • Display boards
  • Working in groups to construct a weather instrument of their choice using the available local materials and display in class
2.4 Historical Information
  1. Oral Questions
  2. Teacher made tests
  3. Observation
  4. Project Work
  5. Anecdotal records
  • Local and extended environment
  • Photographs, pictures and paintings
  • TV/video/films/slides/ Internet sources
  • Vetted digital resources, educational computer games
  • Approved textbooks and other printed resources
  • Resource persons
  • Artefacts
  • Museum, Monuments, Cultural and historical sites
  • Newspaper cuttings
  • Libraries
  • Conducting a library research on the sources of historical information
  • Designing posters on sources of historical information and displaying
3.0 People AndPopulation 3.1. Human origin
  1. Oral questions
  2. Written tests
  3. Project work
  4. Observation
  • Resource persons
  • Maps
  • Digital resources
  • Charts, marker pens
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • Internet
  • Library resources
  • Museums
  • Artefacts
  • Composing and singing songs about human origin
  • creating posters or communication messages or videos on human origin and share with the school community
3.2. Early Civilization
  1. Oral questions 
  2. Observations
  3. Written tests
  • Digital resources
  • Map of Africa
  • Marker pens
  • Manilla papers
  • Stickers/Flash cards
  • Internet resources
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • Singing a song on the  importance of cultural diversity in Africa
  • Drawing and displaying charts on migration routes
3.3 Social organization of selected communities in Africa up to 1900
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observations
  3. Written tests
  • Digital resources
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • Museums
  • Artefacts
  • Resource person
  • Reciting poems on importance of social organization of the (Okiek, Shona and Asante)
  • Modelling aspects of social organization of selected communities in Africa upto 1900
  • (Okiek, Shona and Asante)
3.4 Human Diversity and Inclusion
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observation
  3. Written tests
  4. Checklists
  5. Anecdotal records
  6. Project
  • Digital resources
  • Flip charts/Manilla papers
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • Role-playing social values of various cultural groups
  • Conducting a civic dialogue with community members about the importance of valuing
3.5. Peace and Conflict Resolution
  1. Oral questions
  2. Written tests
  3. Portfolio
  4. Project
  • Digital resources
  • Flip charts/manila papers
  • Maps
  • Internet
  • Approved text books
  • In groups compose and recite poems that promote inner peace
  • Develop slogans on inner peace
  • Develop posters on inner peace
3.6.Slavery and Servitude
  1. Oral questions
  2. Written tests
  3. Portfolio Project
  • Digital resources
  • Flip charts/manila papers
  • Maps
  • Internet
  • Approved text books
  • Debate in clubs on evils of slavery and servitude and ways of curbing them
3.7.Population Distribution in Africa
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observation
  3. Written tests
  4. Checklists
  • Digital resources
  • Flip charts/manila papers
  • Maps
  • Internet
  • Approved text books
  • Design posters / models of settlement patterns in Africa
3.8. Field Work
  1. Oral questions
  2. Written tests
  3. Portfolio
  4. Project
  • Digital resources
  • Flip charts/Manilla papers
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • Engage a resource person to discuss methods of data collection and recording during field work
4.0 Resources and Economic Activities 4.1 Economic Organization of Selected African Communities
  1. oral questions
  2. written tests
  3. observations
  • Map of Africa
  • Internet
  • Photographs
  • Structuring a debate on economic organization of selected African communities
4.2 Agriculture Development of Early Agriculture in Africa.
  • Eastern African Region and

Egypt
  1. checklist
  2. project
  3. written tests
  4. oral questions
  5. aural questions
  • Realia
  • Chart
  • Audio visual
  • Maps
  • Photographs
  • Internet
  • Reciting a poem on promotion of agriculture in Africa
4.3. Multipurpose river projects;
  • River Tana Projects and Aswan High dam
  1. Oral questions
  2. Written tests
  3. Portfolio
  4. Project
  • Charts
  • Resource person
  • Photographs/Pictures
  • Map
  • Appropriate digital devices
  • Modelling River Tana multipurpose Projects using locally available materials
4.4. Sustainable use of Resources
  1. Oral questions
  2. Written tests
  3. Observations
  • Realia
  • Chart
  • Audio visual
  • Maps
  • Photographs
  • Internet
  • Compose and sing a song on importance of sustainable use of available resources
5.0 Political Development and Governance 5.1Political organization of selected communities in Africa up to 1900
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observations
  3. Written tests
  4. Project work
  • Maps
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • Photographs
  • Internet
  • Library resources
  • Charts
  • Journals
  • Composing poems on political organization of the selected communities
  • Visiting a local museum to find out how the local communities were organized and writing a report on the visit to share in class
5.2 Scramble and Partition of Africa
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observations
  3. Written tests
  • Videos clips
  • Map of Africa
  • Stickers/Flash cards
  • Internet resources
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • Creating poems on the scramble and partition of Africa
5.3 The Constitution of Kenya
(3 Lessons)
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observations
  3. Written tests
  4. Journaling
  • Internet resources
  • Approved text books and other printed resource
  • The Constitution of Kenya
  • TV/Video
  • Conducting a library research and writing journals on selected chapters of the constitution and share with family.
5.4 Democracy
(3 Lessons)
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observations
  3. Written tests
  • Digital resources
  • Flip charts/Manilla papers
  • Internet sources
  • Developing messages on types of democracy and sharing in school and at home
  • Developing posters on democratic values and
displaying in class
5.5 Human Rights
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observations
  3. Written tests
  • Posters
  • Flip charts/ Manilla papers
  • Resource person
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • The Constitution of Kenya
  • Developing messages on protection of human rights
  • Creating awareness in the community on protection of human
  • Conduct debates during club meetings on ways of ensuring equity through enhancing access, equal opportunities and equitable distribution of resources
  • Organize a symposium on life skills and values that would
    enhance ability rights (assertiveness, negotiation, problem solving, and values such as responsibility and respect for self and others
  • Organize and participate in commemorating the International Day for Elimination for Racial Discrimination of 21st March
5.6. African Diasporas
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observations
  3. Written tests
  • Internet
  • Flip charts/Manilla papers
  • Masking tapes marker pens/pencils
  • TV/Video
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • Organize a symposium on the role of African Diasporas in socio- economic and political development
  • Composing songs and poems on African diasporas and share them with others
5.7. Global
Citizenship
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observations
  3. Written tests
  •  Internet
  • Flip charts/Manilla papers
  • Masking tapes marker pens/pencils
  • TV/Video
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • The Constitution of Kenya
  • Composing poems on global citizenship
  • Developing posters on qualities of global citizen and posting them at strategic positions in the school.
  • Creating awareness in the community on global citizenship
  • prepare scrap books to write down on the local, national, regional and global issues affecting people in form of a story
  • Celebrating World Day on Social Justice
5.8. Global Governance
  1. Oral questions
  2. Observations
  3. Written tests
  4. Journaling
  • Posters
  • TV/Video
  • Approved text books
  • Flip charts/ manila papers
  • Approved text books and other printed resources
  • The Constitution of Kenya
  • design litter bins displaying the member countries the AU
  • create talking walls and trees to illustrate the organizational structure of the AU
  • Celebrating/observing the international days related to Global
    Governance such as International Environment day/International day on multi-literalism and diplomacy for peace.
Read 377 times Last modified on Monday, 09 January 2023 09:54

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